Category: Republicans

July 23rd, 2017 by Staff Writer

Under the leadership of recently elected chairman Tom Perez, the Democratic National Committee is strapped for cash.

According to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission, the DNC is currently $3.3 million in the red. In June, the party raised just $5.5 million while they spent $5.7 million, meaning they added $200,000 in debt.

Meanwhile, the Republican National Committee outpaced the DNC by more than $8 million in June, raising more than $13.5 million.

The DNC ended the month with just $7.4 million with cash on hand, while the RNC has nearly $45 million in cash on hand, according to the filings.

The Republican Party has raised more than $75 million in 2017 alone.

It’s not clear what exactly has led to a poor financial status for the Democratic Party, but so far into 2017, the party is widely seen as being haphazard and without any real leaders or a central message.

Indeed, even during the party’s convention in February to elect a new chairperson, the party’s factions — the establishment versus the more liberal and progressive wing — remained widely divided. Perez, who served as labor secretary under former President Barack Obama, eventually defeated Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), but the party remains in shambles.

It doesn’t help that the Democrats have been defeated in each of the special elections they needed to win in order to build momentum for 2018.

In the 2018 midterms, Democrats will attempt to regain control of Congress, though it doesn’t look too promising. Democrats will need to take more than two dozen seats from Republicans in the House, while they will need to win just a handful of seats in the Senate to regain control there. However, as far as the Senate, only six of the 33 seats up for grabs are currently held by Republicans, which means Democrats will likely be on the defensive in 2018 — not the offense.

Republicans, on the other hand, with control of the White House and Congress, will go on the offensive in 2018. They stand to make more gains as long as President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans make good on promises they’ve made for years, such as repealing Obamacare and lowering taxes.

Posted in Campaign 2018, Democrats, DNC, Politics, Republicans, RNC, Tom Perez

July 18th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Rapper and singer Kid Rock for Republican senator?

Kid Rock — real name Robert James Ritchie — seems to be making strides into entering the political arena, and after kicking around the idea of running for Senate, has unveiled some of his policies on things such as health care and taxes.

Ritchie on Monday revealed his possible plans for the future, and in a tweet said, “I believe if you work your butt off and pay taxes, you should be able to easily understand the laws, tax codes, health care and anything else the government puts in place that affects us all.”

Last week, Ritchie seemed to announce a tentative bid for Senate in the wake of looming reports that he’d be running — also on Twitter — saying, “I will have a major announcement in the near future.”

See his full announcement in the Twitter update below.

https://t.co/RRVgISDFeq pic.twitter.com/zPDlqeHzJl

— Kid Rock (@KidRock) July 17, 2017

Posted in Celebrities, Entertainment, Kid Rock, Politics, Republicans, Senate, senators

July 17th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) doesn’t believe the Senate will repeal Obamacare and pass a health care replacement bill anytime soon. Paul offered the sobering update over the weekend during an appearance on “Fox News Sunday.”

When asked if he believes Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has enough votes to pass an Obamacare replacement, Paul said he doesn’t believe McConnell does.

“You know, I don’t think right now he does,” Paul said.

“The real problem we have is that we won four elections on repealing Obamacare but [the Senate GOP’s replacement bill] keeps most of Obamacare taxes, keeps most of the regulations, keeps most of the subsidies and creates something that Republicans have never been for and that’s a giant insurance bailout superfund,” Paul explained. “That’s not a Republican idea to give taxpayer money to a private industry that already makes $15 billion in profit.”

When asked by show host Chris Wallace what course of action Republicans should take should they fail to pass health care reform, Paul suggested they repeal Obamacare and its taxes, regulations and mandates then worry about passing a replacement bill later.

“What I’ve suggested to the president…if this comes to an impasse, I think if the president jumps into the fray and says ‘Look guys, you promised to repeal it, let’s just repeal what we can agree to,’” Paul explained. “And then we can continue to try to fix, replace or whatever has to happen afterwards.”

“But the one thing we should do is try to repeal as many of the taxes, as many of the regulations and as many of the mandates as we possibly can,” Paul emphasized, noting that he’s optimistic for compromise to come to Senate Republicans.

Paul explained that he can’t currently support the Senate’s health care bill because it keeps the heart of Obamacare alive, which Paul called the bill’s “fundamental flaw.”

“Mandates on insurance cause prices to rise and young, healthy people then say ‘Ill wait until I get sick [to buy insurance].’ And then the insurance pool gets sicker and sicker — it’s called adverse selection, we also call it the ‘death spiral,’” Paul said. “The Republican plan admits that it will continue.”

“The Republican plan doesn’t fix the death spiral of Obamacare, it simply subsidizes it,” Paul explained.

McConnell over the weekend announced that any vote on a health care replacement would be postponed until Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) returns to Washington. McCain is recovering at home in Arizona after undergoing surgery on Friday for a blood clot above his left eye.

.@RandPaul: “I don’t think Republicans should put their name on this [bill].” https://t.co/rE5W333VUU pic.twitter.com/OMPNg9e78k

— Fox News (@FoxNews) July 16, 2017

Posted in Fox News, GOP, Health Care, Obamacare, Politics, Rand Paul, Republicans, Senate, watch

June 23rd, 2017 by Staff Writer

Fox News’ Tucker Carlson broke into hysterical laughter while discussing immigration and job creation with former deputy press secretary for the Democratic National Committee on Thursday night’s airing of “Tucker Carlson Tonight.”

While speaking with Jose Aristimuno, the former DNC secretary claimed that Republican Karen Handel’s victory over Democrat Jon Ossoff was closer than Republicans would like, and that Democratic momentum is gaining for the House in 2018.

“Republicans keep losing their base,” Aristimuno told Carlson. “We are gaining momentum. We are going to win the House in 2018, I’m telling you.”

Carlson asked Aristimuno precisely what the Democratic message is, and how it compares to that of the Republicans, when all it appears Democrats do is push back on President Donald Trump as their base.

“If you’re going to have a message, a program, and say to voters, ‘Here’s what I’m going to bring to you if you elect me,’ you have to be able to explain it,” Carlson explained to Aristimuno.

Aristimuno responded that Democrats’ tent poles for 2018 include creating more middle class jobs and allowing heavier immigration into the United States, but Carlson seemed completely baffled by the lack of correlation between the two.

“Have you thought this through at all?” Carlson asked incredulously. “Maybe that’s why you keep losing, because you say dumb things that don’t make any sense.”

Throughout Aristimuno’s round-and-round comments, Carlson cracked laughing several times, shaking his head in what appeared to be disbelief at the words coming from the Democrat’s mouth.

See the full exchange in the video below.

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

Posted in control of house, Democrats, House, Jose Aristimuno, Media, Republicans, Tucker Carlson

June 19th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Caitlyn Jenner was heavily criticized by liberals over the weekend after a video surfaced showing Jenner joking about them at a Republican conference in Washington D.C.

Jenner made the joke Friday evening at the annual College Republican National Committee’s conference during a discussion about last week’s shooting that targeted congressional Republicans practicing for the annual congressional baseball game.

“Nobody deserves what happened out there,” Jenner said, according to the Washington Examiner. “There’s no justification.”

“There are crazy people. We have to minimize that type of stuff,” Jenner added. “As far as the people that were injured, it’s an absolute shame. You just want them to recover.”

“Fortunately the guy was a really bad shot…liberals can’t even shoot straight,” the former Olympic champion quipped.

Jenner was referring to 66-year-old James Hodgkinson, the now-deceased man who ambushed a group of Republican congressmen last Wednesday morning while they practiced at a baseball field in Alexandria, Virginia. It was discovered through Hodgkinson’s social media channels that he was a devout progressive liberal who had a deep hatred for Republicans and President Donald Trump.

Though the motive of the attack will never truly be known, most believe Hodgkinson’s hatred of Republicans motivated him to carry out the attack.

Hodgkinson was able to critical injure House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), a GOP congressional aide and two Capitol Police officers before he was shot and subdued by the Capitol Police officers, who were part of Scalise’s security detail.

More from the Washington Examiner:

Jenner’s remarks at the convention came in the form of a question and answer session where a moderator incorporated questions submitted by college students in the audience. Over the course of the dinner, Jenner spoke on a variety of topics, from Kanye West to the Paris climate agreement, which the track and field legend said was “just a way for the rest of the world to kind of ruin us economically.”

Video of Jenner’s remarks were originally uploaded to Facebook, but the video has since been deleted. Another video of Jenner’s remarks were later uploaded to YouTube.

Needless to say, liberals were angered by Jenner’s remarks:

Is Caitlyn Jenner privileged, tone deaf, and out of touch? 100%

But why is her gender the first attack people take? Even liberals?

— Chris Crocker (@ChrisCrocker) June 18, 2017

This comment is not ok, @Caitlyn_Jenner. Key trait American shooters share isnt political party, but history of domestic violence. https://t.co/HqD6YtW24h

— Shannon Watts (@shannonrwatts) June 17, 2017

And, that, my friends, is how Caitlyn Jenner became the least likeable trans person on Earth. https://t.co/BGgCTo85LK

— Harvey King of Shade (@bodysculptorokc) June 17, 2017

Caitlyn Jenner killed a person because she couldn’t drive straight. https://t.co/YXMlydLHzB

— Denizcan James (@MrFilmkritik) June 17, 2017

It’s sad watching @Caitlyn_Jenner defend a group that will NEVER EVER truly accept her while condemning those who fight for her rights

— Cyn Rosales (@Cynrosles83) June 18, 2017

Caitlyn Jenner is high key the worst…an angry white feminist who doesn’t care about Trump’s policies until they affect her

— Adrianne Ramsey (@adrianne_ramsey) June 12, 2017

remember that year or two when everyone had to pretend kanye west and caitlyn jenner were woke baes and not coke-addled simpletons

— Alex Nichols (@Lowenaffchen) June 17, 2017

Posted in Caitlyn Jenner, Liberals, Republicans, Shooting, US

June 16th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Politically charged musician Ted Nugent appeared on WABC Radio’s “Curtis & Eboni,” and in the aftermath of the GOP congressional shooting, Nugent claimed that he can’t engage in “hateful” political rhetoric any longer.

“I cannot and I will not and I encourage even my friends/enemies on the left in the Democrat and liberal world that we got to be more civil to each other,” Nugent said. “The whole world is watching America where you have the God-given right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And we have to be more respectful to the other side.”

He continued and said, “I’m gonna take a deep breath, and I’m gonna back down. And if it gets fiery, if it gets hateful, I’m going away and I’m not gonna engage in that hateful rhetoric anymore.”

The rocker also acknowledged his previous speeches directed at Democrats Hillary Clinton and former President Barack Obama, saying that the reason he would engage in such controversial rhetoric was because he was so hyped up and angry about the political climate.

“I’m not trying to make excuses, but when I made those wild a** comments on stage against then-Senator Hillary Clinton and then-Senator Barack Obama, I don’t know if you can grasp the degree of adrenaline and intensity and over-the-top animal spirit and attitude that I live on stage,” he said.

He added that going further, “I will avoid anything that can be interpreted as condoning or referencing violence.”

Previously, Nugent asserted that Clinton should suck on the end of his machine gun, called Obama a “sub-human mongrel,” and during the 2016 presidential election, said that Bernie Sanders (I-VT) should “eat s**t and die.”

Hear Nugent’s full remarks in the audio below.

Posted in Democrats, Entertainment, interviews, left-wing group, Republicans, Ted Nugent

June 12th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Republican billionaire Sheldon Adelson is a forming a new “super” political action committee designed for one purpose: keeping Republicans in control of the House of Representatives through 2030.

According to reports by CNN and the Washington Examiner, Adelson has started working to convince other wealthy and influential Republicans to help fund a super PAC whose sole mission would be to help Republicans in state legislative and gubernatorial races. The purpose of funding these races would be to ensure Republicans maintain their firm grip on statehouses across the country, which could give the party a substantial advantage over the next 13 years.

In the wake of the 2016 election, 33 governors are Republicans, and Republicans have control over both chambers in state legislatures in 32 states. Democrats only control five: California, Delaware, Hawaii, Oregon and Rhode Island.

This is incredibly important, because every 10 years, many states redraw the boundaries of their House districts, giving the party in control the power to create districts that benefit it for a decade into the future. If Republicans maintain their control over statehouses over the next two elections, it’s likely they’ll be able to move the House, which already heavily favors Republicans, even further in their direction, making it incredibly difficult for Democrats to gain control of the House again until district lines are redrawn in 2030.

According to CNN’s report, Adelson has said he would himself be willing to commit significant financial resources to the proposed super PAC. Adelson has given hundreds of millions of dollars to help Republicans and conservative groups during his lifetime.

Some have criticized the White House for not doing more to reach out to donors, according to the Examiner’s report.

“I don’t think spends his time reaching out to donors,” said Spencer Zwick, a fundraiser for former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.). “The way they got elected was not the way Romney built his campaign.”

One of the purposes of Adelson’s super PAC is said to be to help fill that fundraising-leadership void.

Posted in Election 2018, Politics, Republican Party, Republicans

June 2nd, 2017 by Staff Writer

During Thursday’s airing of “Outnumbered,” conservative host Meghan McCain called Hillary Clinton’s latest appearances “unhinged” and “erratic.”

McCain said that Clinton’s latest public speaking events have bordered on “unusual,” and noted that Clinton just can’t seem to get over the fact that she lost the 2016 presidential election to then-candidate Donald Trump.

After airing footage of Clinton’s Wednesday appearance at #CodeCon, where she threw her own party under the bus, McCain called Clinton “emotionally unhealthy.”

“I inherited nothing from the Democratic Party,” Clinton said during #CodeCon. “I mean, it was bankrupt. It was on the verge of insolvency. Its data was mediocre to poor — nonexistent, wrong. I had to inject money into it — the DNC — to keep it going.”

“I’ve been around politicians who have lost big,” McCain said. “Normally they do [get over it]. This is unusual, I’m telling you — to go on TV, to be this angry to be blaming everybody else but yourself; she’s clearly not dealing with it emotionally in the way that I think is healthy.”

McCain noted earlier in the segment that Clinton blamed “24 separate things” during Wednesday’s panel for her election loss.

Those pinpointed by McCain included:

The FBI

James Comey, then FBI Director

The Russians

Vladimir Putin

‘Anti-American forces’

Low information voters

Everyone who assumed she’d win

Bad polling numbers

Obama for winning two terms

People wanting change

Misogynists

Suburban women

The New York Times

Television executives

Cable news

Netflix

Democrats not making the right documentaries

Facebook

Twitter

Wikileaks

Fake news

‘Content farms in Macedonia’

The Republican Party

The Democratic Party

See McCain’s full remarks in the video below.

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

Posted in Democrats, Fox News, Hillary Clinton, Meghan McCain, Outnumbered, Politics, Republicans, unhinged

May 31st, 2017 by Staff Writer

Right-wing talk show host Rush Limbaugh ripped into the Republican party, making his case that it wasn’t just the Democrats that are road blocking Trump, but rather those in his own party. He made the comments on his radio show Tuesday.

“I don’t understand how people don’t get that it’s not just the Democrats in Washington that are roadblocking Trump,” Limbaugh said.

“Mitch McConnell says he can’t see a way to getting 50 votes for the House Obamacare repeal bill?” he asked rhetorically. “Now, stop and think here, folks. Back when the only element that we had was the House of Representatives and Republican voters were constantly saying, ‘Why aren’t you doing more to stop Obama? Why aren’t you trying to do something to stop Obamacare?’ The answer was always, ‘Well, all we’ve got is the House. W-w-we can’t get anything through the Senate because the Democrats own the Senate. Obama’s in the White House! He’ll veto anything if it did make it there.’”

“So voters gave Republicans the Senate,” he continued, “and Mitch McConnell said, ‘Well, the first thing you have to know is it takes 60 votes to do anything in the Senate, and we don’t have 60 votes. We only have 52.’ And then he would add, ‘Plus, as long as Obama’s still in the White House, all this is academic anyway. He’s gonna veto whatever we pass.’ So we gave the Republicans the White House and elected Trump.”

“It’s the Republicans standing up and saying, ‘I just don’t see how we’re — there’s no room here. I don’t know how we’re gonna lower rates when you have this exemption over here and you have this exemption there,’” Limbaugh explained. “And I just read this stuff and I shake my head. They don’t want to cut taxes. Either they don’t want to cut taxes institutionally, they don’t want to cut taxes economically, or they just don’t want to do the heavy lifting. I don’t know what it is.”

“My guess is they don’t want to help Trump,” he concluded.

“Now, you would think Trump figures this out,” Limbaugh continued, “but he doesn’t give any evidence of it. Like he tweeted something: ‘U.S. Senate should switch to 51 votes immediately and get health care and tax cuts approved fast and easy. Democrats would do it no doubt.’ He’s talking about getting rid of the 60-vote requirement to shut off debate and just go to simple majority on every bill. Does he know that it’s the Republicans that are the roadblock here? He has to know, and certainly if he’s got people around him who know.”

Rush was recently criticized by many for seemingly approving of the assault by a Montana Republican candidate on a reporter. The candidate, Greg Gianforte, apologized to the reporter after winning the election.

Linh Bui has more.

Posted in Democrats, Donald Trump, Politics, President Donald Trump, Republicans, Rush Limbaugh, Trump

May 28th, 2017 by Staff Writer

A new study produced by the Pew Research Center has found that since December 2015, about two months before the first presidential primary contest, more young Republicans have “defected” from the Republican Party and now identify as Democrats or lean in favor of the Democratic Party than the number of Democrats who have defected to the Republican Party over the same period.

According to the study, released on May 17, 23 percent of young people aged 18 to 29 who identified as Republican in December 2015 said in March 2017 they now identify as Democrats or lean in that party’s favor. The data used to conduct the Pew study were extracted from the responses of 5,154 “panelists” from six surveys taken in “December 2015, April, August, December 2016, and March and April 2017.”

The data used in the study were weighted in an attempt to account for multiple perceived biases in the study, such as differences in people who agree to participate in studies compared to those who don’t.

The Pew Research Center also found an additional 21 percent of young people stopped identifying with the Republican Party at some point during the study period but returned by March 2017. Only 53 percent of young people remained Republican over the entire study.

By comparison, 76 percent of young people identifying as Democrats kept that identification throughout the entire study. About 12 percent left but later returned, and 9 percent switched to the Republican Party.

Interestingly, when all age groups were taken into account, the researchers found nearly identical results for the two political parties. From December 2015 to March 2017, 78 percent of people identifying as Republicans remained Republican over the entire study period, while 9 percent left but returned and 11 percent switched to the Democratic Party side. Similarly, 79 percent of Democrats consistently identified with the party over the same period, while 9 percent left but returned and 10 percent left and did not return.

Of those surveyed in April who had defected from the Republican Party, 84 percent said they disapproved of President Donald Trump, with 57 percent saying they strongly disapproved. Of those who defected from the Democratic Party, 62 percent said they approve of Trump’s performance in the White House.

Young Republicans more likely than older Republicans – and young Democrats – to switch parties

Trump’s approval numbers have been steadily worsening since his inauguration and have been particularly poor in May. The Real Clear Politics average of approval polls taken from May 11-25 shows 39.9 percent of respondents approve of Trump and 54.2 percent disapprove.

In the week leading up to the 2016 presidential election, the RCP average showed Hillary Clinton beating Trump 46.8 percent to 43.6 percent.

Posted in Donald Trump, Politics, Republican Party, Republicans

May 9th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Charles Krauthammer called former President Barack Obama’s “Profile in Courage” acceptance speech “complete moral condescension” during Fox News’ Monday night airing of “Special Report With Bret Baier.”

“It’s been a full 100 days but it’s nice to be reminded of why we should be grateful as a nation that he is gone,” Krauthammer said about Obama’s Sunday night speech. “There are a lot of arguments you can make on either side of the debate about Obamacare but notice how it was complete moral condescension. The other guys are cowards because I, and the people who support me, and oppose the legislation, stand with the poor and the afflicted and all of that and the others are on the side of the rich and powerful. That is nonsense.”

Claiming that Obama always assumed he was “on the side of angels” during his presidency, Krauthammer said a firm goodbye to the former president.

“Obama did that all through his presidency – always assuming he was on the side of the angels and always the one who was willing to go against public opinion when it was completely the opposite,” Krauthammer said. “He reminded us, reminded me, it’s been 100 days, but good riddance, Mr. President.”

While accepting the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation’s Profile in Courage award, given annually to public officials whose “actions demonstrate the qualities of politically courageous leadership,” Obama took aim at Republicans and at the passing of AHCA.

During his speech, he blasted Republicans and said that it doesn’t take “courage” to help those who aren’t needy.

“As everyone here now knows, this great debate is not settled, but continues,” Obama said. “It is my fervent hope, and the hope of millions, that regardless of party, such courage is still possible, that today’s members of Congress, regardless of party, are willing to look at the facts and speak the truth, even when it contradicts party positions.”

Calling on politicians to do what “is right” for people instead of politicians, Obama said, “I hope that current members of Congress recall that it actually doesn’t take a lot of courage to aid those who are already powerful, already comfortable, already influential, but it does require some courage to champion the vulnerable, and the sick and the infirm — those who often have no access to the corridors of power.”

See Krauthammer’s comments on “Special Report With Bret Baier” below.

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

Posted in Barack Obama, Charles Krauthammer, Democrats, Fox News, Politics, Republicans

May 7th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Following the House successfully voting to repeal Obamacare and replace it with the American Health Care Act, angry Democrats and liberals took to Twitter to mock Republicans with “things Jesus never said.”

In fact, on Friday and Saturday the hashtag “#ThingsJesusNeverSaid” was one of the highest trending topics on Twitter worldwide. At first, the hashtag was used to mock Republicans for allegedly removing the pre-existing conditions provision in Obamacare.

But the hashtag quickly devolved into broader criticisms of President Donald Trump and the Republican Party as a whole.

Users criticized the GOP for being against refugees and immigration, for wanting to replace Obamacare with a market-based solution, for advocating tax reform, for wanting to build a wall on the southern U.S.-Mexico border, among other current American political issues.

One user wrote: “#ThingsJesusNeverSaid ‘You have a pre-existing condition, I can’t cure you.’”

Another added: “‘Build that wall’ #ThingsJesusNeverSaid.”

Even a Catholic priest added to the rhetoric: “‘Blessed are those whose mercy extends only to those who are like them.’ #ThingsJesusNeverSaid.”

But the hashtag works both ways, liberals quickly learned.

Conservatives, Republicans and libertarians on Twitter were quick to hit back with some statements of their own, mostly focusing on the fact that Democrats and liberals alike generally advocate for abortion, which many contend is murder.

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, but before you gestated for nine months you weren’t a human being.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Andrew Klavan (@andrewklavan) May 6, 2017

#ThingsJesusNeverSaid women should have the right to choose to kill their babies.

— Jeb Sanford (@JebSanford) May 6, 2017

“Sure, you can totally kill babies. No problem.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Matt Walsh (@MattWalshBlog) May 6, 2017

“Blessed are the children, unless they are unplanned.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Craigé Schmuckatelli (@CraigR3521) May 6, 2017

“It’s not a baby, it’s just a blob of cells.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— The Morning Spew (@TheMorningSpew) May 6, 2017

While others added other issues to the mix:

#ThingsJesusNeverSaid It totally counts as compassion if you let the government pretend to care for the poor.

— Emily Zanotti (@emzanotti) May 6, 2017

#ThingsJesusNeverSaid: There are 80 different genders.

— Mark Dice (@MarkDice) May 6, 2017

“Marriage is whatever you want it to be.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Matt Walsh (@MattWalshBlog) May 6, 2017

https://twitter.com/WayneDupreeShow/status/860840482485809153

It must be noted that despite the liberal outrage, the AHCA is not yet law. In fact, the Senate has not even voted on the bill yet, and it’s expected they will pass a different version of the law, complicating the law making process.

Posted in American Health Care ACt, Democrats, GOP, Jesus Christ, Liberals, Obamacare, Politics, Republicans, Twitter

May 4th, 2017 by Staff Writer

After more deliberation and some last minute changes to the bill Wednesday, Republicans have announced that they will be voting on the Obamacare replacement bill, the “American Health Care Act,” on Thursday.

Republican House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said he was confident the bill would pass the House Thursday.

“Do we have the votes? Yes.” McCarthy told reporters. “Will we pass it? Yes.” The bill would then go the Senate for consideration if passed.

A key in giving moderates the cover to support the bill was a trip by Reps. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) and and Billy Long (R-Mo.) with President Donald Trump where they secured $8 billion over 5 years in order to shore up coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions.

Freedom Caucus ally Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) told the Blaze’s Dana Loesch Tuesday that he still opposed the bill, saying, “When you come to drain the swamp, don’t ask the creatures in the swamp how to drain the swamp.”

Earlier Wednesday congressional GOP leaders said that they would not schedule a vote unless they were sure that a bill would pass.

CBS Miamis Eliott Rodriguez reports.

Posted in Affordable Health Care Act, Donald Trump, Politics, Republicans, Trump

March 22nd, 2017 by Staff Writer

Judge Neil Gorsuch reflected on the toll of the Supreme Court confirmation process during his hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday afternoon.

While fielding questions from Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) about campaign finance — specifically regarding the conservative Judicial Crisis Network’s $10 million ad buy supporting Gorsuch’s confirmation to the bench, the nominee lamented the sacrifices that come with entering the political fray.

“Senator,” Gorsuch began, “there’s a lot about this confirmation process today that I regret. A lot. A lot.”

That comment sparked a few nervous laughs to break out, piercing through the awkward silence filling the chamber.

Gorsuch, a 49-year-old federal appellate judge on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, invoked the late Supreme Court Justice Byron White, a fellow Coloradan for whom he clerked and remembers as a “childhood hero,” noting how the process has changed over the years.

Former President John F. Kennedy, a Democrat, nominated White for the Supreme Court  in 1962.

“When Bryon White sat here,” Gorsuch told Whitehouse, “it was 90 minutes. He was through this body in two weeks and he smoked cigarettes while he gave his testimony.”

“There’s a great deal about this process I regret,” he continued. “I regret putting my family through this.”

Gorsuch, who is President Donald Trump’s nominee to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia, went into conformation hearings Monday under a cloud of political rancor.

In the final year of President Barack Obama’s administration, the outgoing Democrat nominated Judge Merrick Garland to replace Scalia on the Supreme Court bench. The Republicans, however, never held hearings on Garland, citing the so-called “Biden rule,” named after former Vice President Joe Biden.

In 1992, Biden, then-chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said: “Action on a Supreme Court nomination must be put off until after the election campaign is over.”

“It is a president’s constitutional right to nominate a Supreme Court justice and it is the Senate’s constitutional right to act as a check on a president, and withhold its consent,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said in March 2016.

On Tuesday, Gorsuch refused to comment on Garland’s predicament, arguing that it would be inappropriate for him to engage in “political” discourse as a judge.

“I think it would be imprudent for judges to start commenting on political disputes between themselves or the various branches,” he said, according to the Washington Post.

As for questions regarding campaign finance, Gorsuch’s answer to Whitehouse was simple: If you don’t like the law, change it.

“The fact of the matter is, it is what it is, and it’s this body that makes the laws,” the Trump nominee said. “If you wish to have more disclosure, pass a law, and a judge will enforce it, senator.”

Posted in confirmation hearing, Democrats, Donald Trump, Neil Gorsuch, Politics, Republicans, Senate, Supreme Court

March 18th, 2017 by Staff Writer

On Tuesday, Senate Republicans introduced a bill that would protect the rights of gun owners traveling over state lines from falling into the complicated laws that differ in each state.

Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Congressman Morgan Griffith (R-VA) introduced S.618 , which would amend the Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986 to clarify key provisions in the law. According to a statement released on Hatch’s website, the bill will prevent anyone with a gun, ammunition, or magazines from falling outside of the law simply by passing through.

“This bill safeguards our Second Amendment rights by strengthening federal protections for responsible gun owners travelling across state lines,” Hatch said.  “By amending the Firearms Owners’ Protection Act of 1986, this commonsense proposal puts an end to the harassment of upstanding citizens who happen to stay overnight, fuel up, or stop for an emergency during their travels in another state.”

“I believe it is important to defend the Second Amendment right of law-abiding gun owners,” said Griffith. “Current federal law or the Second Amendment of the Constitution should neither be misinterpreted nor ignored to prevent law-abiding, responsible gun owners from traveling throughout the country with firearms so long as they are in compliance with federal law while in transit.”

The bill already has the support of multiple Republican senators such as James Lankford (R-OK), Steve Daines (R-MT), Ted Cruz (R-TX), John Cornyn (R-TX), and Mike Rounds (R-SD). The bill also being supported by the National Rifle Association.

“This legislation will restore the intent of Congress to protect law-abiding Americans who exercise their fundamental Second Amendment rights when they travel,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action.

Senator Hatch and Representative Griffith’s bill addresses a critical gap in all Americans’ abilities to exercise  their Second Amendment rights and participate in hunting and shooting sports across state lines,” said Lawrence Keane, senior vice president of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, who also supports the bill.

This bill should give rest to those whose professions include constant travel such as truck drivers, and should also put at ease any gun owner has about being harassed by police in states they do not live in.

Guns.com lists two such instances where gun owners have had to face problems due to simply being a gun owner in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Gun owners often find themselves in a Catch-22 while traveling with their firearms. In one case, a man relocating from Texas to Maine stopped for a nap in a New Jersey parking lot and woke up to an arrest after authorities in the Garden State searched his vehicle and found his gun collection. Another incident saw a man traveling from Florida to New Jersey who was detained in Maryland for nearly an hour even though he had no firearm in the vehicle when police there pinged his driver’s license and found that he had a concealed carry permit.

 

 

Posted in 2nd Amendment, firearms guns, Government, NRA, Orrin Hatch, Republicans, travel

January 10th, 2017 by Staff Writer

A controversial painting hung at Capitol Hill display is the reason that Democrat Rep. William Lacy Clay (D-Mo.) is calling on police to press charges of theft against Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.).

Hunter decided to take down the painting Friday because the depiction of a policeman as a pig was offensive to law enforcement officials, and Clay is demanding that he be charged with theft. Capitol police have denied the request, likely because Hunter took the painting down but promptly returned it to Clay’s possession soon after.

Clay’s chief of staff demanded to know why their request was denied in an email to Matthew Verderosa, the Capitol Police Chief:

Our office was informed an hour ago that you personally declined to take an official complaint from U.S. Rep. Wm. Lacy Clay regarding the theft of his district painting on loan to the US House for display.

There is a clear D.C. statute that defines theft — it is a taking and carrying away of the property of another without right. If you have a different perspective please explain. Further, please explain why Congressman Duncan Hunter appears to be above the law.

CBS News offered this description of the offensive painting:

The painting showed a police officer taking aim at protesters with signs saying “history” and “stop kill.” The police officer has an elongated face with tusks, much like a razorback pig. The background includes the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and a young black man looking out from prison bars. One of the figures also appears to show a protester as a wolf.

Clay’s website gives the following description of the artwork: “The painting portrays a colorful landscape of symbolic characters representing social injustice, the tragic events in Ferguson, Missouri, and the lingering elements of inequality in modern American society.”

In this Jan. 5, 2017, photo, a painting by David Pulphus hangs in a hallway displaying paintings by high school students selected by their member of congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., has removed a painting that showed a pig in a police uniform, one of hundreds of artworks on display at the Capitol and sponsored by a member of Congress. Joe Kasper, a spokesman forHunter, says the lawmaker unscrewed the artwork from the display and returned it to the office of Missouri Democratic Rep. William Lacy Clay. (AP Photo/Zach Gibson)
In this Jan. 5, 2017, photo, a painting by David Pulphus hangs in a hallway displaying paintings by high school students selected by their member of congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., has removed a painting that showed a pig in a police uniform, one of hundreds of artworks on display at the Capitol and sponsored by a member of Congress. Joe Kasper, a spokesman forHunter, says the lawmaker unscrewed the artwork from the display and returned it to the office of Missouri Democratic Rep. William Lacy Clay. (AP Photo/Zach Gibson)

The painting caused a lot of furor among law enforcement advocates, and equal anger among police abuse critics when it was taken down by Duncan Hunter. The Republican was recently dinged for using $600 of campaign money for travel expenses for his pet rabbit.

Posted in Black Lives Matter, Democrats, law enforcement, Police Abuse, Police shootings, Politics, Republicans

January 3rd, 2017 by Staff Writer

During a Democratic conference call on Monday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) discussed the future of Obamacare. According to The Hill, Pelosi hasn’t ruled out working with the GOP when it comes to replacing the Affordable Care Act when it is inevitably repealed. She does say this with a warning included, however.

“The ball is in their court,” Pelosi said during a Democratic conference call on Monday, according to ABC’s Rick Klein. “You break it, you own it.”

Of course, many would argue that the ACA was broken from the word go, as many have complained about rising costs, decrease in care quality, and some outright losing their coverage. The Chicago Tribune did an analysis of why Obamacare failed, and came up with an entire list. The prevailing theme of the list, however was it was just unaffordable to the private citizen, the business, and the insurer.

Obamacare failed because it flunked Economics 101 and Human Nature 101. It straitjacketed insurers into providing overly expensive, soup-to-nuts policies. It wasn’t flexible enough so that people could buy as much coverage as they wanted and could afford — not what the government dictated. Many healthy people primarily want catastrophic coverage. Obamacare couldn’t lure them in, couldn’t persuade them to buy on the chance they’d get sick.

Obamacare failed because the penalties for going uncovered are too low when stacked against its skyrocketing premium costs. Next year, the penalty for staying uninsured is $695 per adult, or perhaps 2.5 percent of a family’s taxable household income. That’s far less than many Americans would pay for coverage. Financial incentive: Skip Obamacare.

Despite the fact that the ACA was DOA, Pelosi views the repeal and delay aspects of the GOP plan is “cowardice.

Pelosi also slammed the GOP for seeking to repeal and delay parts of ObamaCare while they come up with a replacement, calling the effort an “act of cowardice.”

“The repeal and delay is an act of cowardice on the part of the Republicans,” Pelosi said, according to another reporter. “This repeal and delay, it doesn’t even have alliteration. It has nothing.”

Even if they found a fun way to make it rhyme, there will be a massive amount of friction in the coming days between Democrats and Republicans as they try to slay the ACA.

Posted in Affordable Care Act, Nancy Pelosi, Obamacare, Politics, Republicans

December 12th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Some Republican members of the House of Representatives have formed what they’re calling the congressional Second Amendment Caucus on Thursday.

According to reports, the group is being led by Kentucky Rep. Thomas Massie with the goal of drafting and sponsoring pro-gun legislation in the upcoming session of Congress. The group released a statement that read, in part:

Caucus members will lead efforts in the House of Representatives to pass meaningful firearms legislation and protect Americans against infringements of the Second Amendment.

The inaugural members of the new caucus include Republican Reps. Jeff Duncan (S.C.), Ted Yoho (Fla.), Brian Babin (Texas), Paul Gosar (Ariz.), Mark Meadows (N.C.), Ken Buck (Colo.), Alex Mooney (W.Va.), Justin Amash (Mich.), Jody Hice (Ga.), Dave Brat (Va.), Warren Davidson (Ohio), Scott Perry (Pa.) and James Comer (Ky.). Other member will be allowed to join if their voting record on gun legislation is acceptable to the caucus members.

According to The Washington Free Beacon, Massie noted that the Republican majority in Congress, as well as the election of a Republican president, contributed to the timing of the group’s decision to form.

“The recent election results present us with a new opportunity to advance pro-gun legislation and reverse the erosion of the Second Amendment that’s occurred over the last few decades,” he said, according to the Free Beacon. “I look forward to working with the new president and this determined group of conservatives to promote a pro-gun agenda.”

The group plans to sponsor and support pro-Second Amendment legislation, and take an active role in the education and training of caucus members by inviting firearms experts and constitutional scholars to speak with the group on a regular basis.

Posted in Government, House of Representatives, Republicans, Second Amendment, Thomas Massie

October 25th, 2016 by Staff Writer

A new poll by CNN/ORC shows that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leads Republican nominee Donald Trump by 5 percent in a 4-way race. The result is not surprising, given that most national polls show Clinton with a similar lead. However, one of the reasons for Clinton’s lead is surprising to some: 17 percent of self-described conservatives plan to vote for Hillary Clinton. By way of contrast, only 7 percent of liberals say they plan to vote for Trump.

In 2012, Republican nominee Mitt Romney also lost 17 percent of self-identified conservatives, but this was mostly offset by the fact that a much larger percent of self-identified liberals (14 percent) voted for Romney.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens as vice presidential candidate Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. speaks during a campaign event at the Taylor Allderdice High School, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, in Pittsburgh, Pa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens as vice presidential candidate Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. speaks during a campaign event at the Taylor Allderdice High School, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, in Pittsburgh, Pa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The poll is one of many that suggests that Clinton has done a better job of consolidating her base than Trump. In spite of WikiLeaks documents showing Clinton staffers at times mocking Clinton’s popular liberal primary opponent, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), and in spite of emails demonstrating a cozy relationship between Clinton and American corporate interests, liberal voters seem less inclined to cross party lines than their conservative counterparts.

One group that has never materialized as a political force in the general election is the so-called “Trump Democrat,” a group that helped carry Trump to victory in a number of Republican primaries. The CNN/ORC poll shows that Trump receives the support of a mere 6 percent of Democrats — roughly the same percent of Republicans who plan to vote for Clinton.

The original crossover Democrat voters were known as “Reagan Democrats” after Reagan won 26 percent of registered Democrats in the 1984 general election.

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Posted in CNN/ORC, Democrats, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Politics, polls, Reagan Democrats, Republicans, Trump Democrats

September 18th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence is in good health, according to a note released by his personal physician Saturday.

According to the two-page letter, the 57-year-old Indiana governor is in “excellent general and cardiovascular health” and “medically able to maintain [his] high level of professional work.”

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence. (Getty Images/John Moore)

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence. (Getty Images/John Moore)

“You live a healthy lifestyle and maintain an excellent diet and exercise program,” wrote Michael Busk, a physician at the St. Vincent Health, Wellness and Preventative Care Institute in Indianapolis. He added that Pence’s main form of exercise is bicycling.

The letter also notes that Pence weighs 208 pounds, neither smokes nor consumes alcohol and the only medication he takes is Claritin, an antihistamine used to fight seasonal allergies.

Busk has been Pence’s physician since March 2013, the letter states.

Pence’s medical records release comes after Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton — along with her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine — also released their partial health records in recent weeks.

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September 6th, 2016 by Staff Writer

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Phyllis Schlafly, the outspoken conservative activist who helped defeat the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s and founded the Eagle Forum political group, has died. She was 92.

Schlafly died Monday afternoon of cancer at her home in St. Louis, her son John Schlafly said.

Schlafly rose to national attention in 1964 with her self-published book, “A Choice Not an Echo,” that became a manifesto for the far right. The book, which sold three million copies, chronicled the history of the Republican National Convention and is credited for helping conservative Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona earn the 1964 GOP nomination.

In this March 11, 2016, file photo, longtime conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump before Trump begins speaking at a campaign rally in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, file)

In this March 11, 2016, file photo, longtime conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump before Trump begins speaking at a campaign rally in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, file)

She later helped lead efforts to defeat the proposed constitutional amendment that would have outlawed gender discrimination, galvanizing the party’s right. She’d graduated from college while working overnight at a factory during World War II, her newspaper column appeared in dozens of newspapers and she was politically active into her 90s — including attending every convention since her first in 1952.

Yet she told The Associated Press in 2007 that perhaps her greatest legacy was the Eagle Forum, which she founded in 1972 in suburban St. Louis, where she lived. The ultraconservative group has chapters in several states and claims 80,000 members.

“I’ve taught literally millions of people how to participate in self-government,” Schlafly said. “I think I’ve built a wonderful organization of volunteers, mostly women but some men, willing to spend their time to get good laws and good politicians.”

The Eagle Forum pushes for low taxes, a strong military and English-only education. The group is against efforts it says are pushed by radical feminists or encroach on U.S. sovereignty, such as guest-worker visas, according to its website, which describes the Equal Rights Amendment as having had a “hidden agenda of tax-funded abortions and same-sex marriages.”

As momentum grew in the 1970s for the amendment, Schlafly became its most outspoken critic — and was vilified by its supporters. She had a pie smashed into her face and pig’s blood thrown on her, and feminist Betty Friedan once told Schlafly: “I’d like to burn you at the stake.” She was chastised in a 1970s “Doonesbury” — a framed copy of which hung on her office wall.

“What I am defending is the real rights of women,” Schlafly said at the time. “A woman should have the right to be in the home as a wife and mother.”

In this Aug. 10, 1976, file photo, women opposed to the Equal Rights Amendment sit with Phyllis Schlafly, left, national chairman of Stop ERA, at hearing of Republican platform subcommittee on human rights and responsibilities in a free society in Kansas City, Mo. Schlafly, who helped defeat the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s and founded the Eagle Forum political group, has died at age 92. The Eagle Forum announced her death in a statement Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo)

In this Aug. 10, 1976, file photo, women opposed to the Equal Rights Amendment sit with Phyllis Schlafly, left, national chairman of Stop ERA, at hearing of Republican platform subcommittee on human rights and responsibilities in a free society in Kansas City, Mo. Schlafly, who helped defeat the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s and founded the Eagle Forum political group, has died at age 92. The Eagle Forum announced her death in a statement Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo)

Thirty-five states ratified the amendment, three short of the necessary 38. Schlafly said amendment supporters couldn’t prove it was needed.

“They were never able to show women would get any benefit out of it,” she told the AP in 2007. “It (the U.S. Constitution) is already sex-neutral. Women already have all the rights that men have.”

Saint Louis University history professor Donald Critchlow, who profiled Schlafly in his 2005 book, “Phyllis Schlafly and Grassroots Conservatism: A Woman’s Crusade,” said the defeat of the amendment helped revive conservatism and helped pave the way for Ronald Reagan’s election in 1980.

“What the ERA (defeat) did was show the right, and especially Reagan strategists, that a new constituency could be tapped to revitalize the right. It allowed the right to take over the party,” Critchlow told the AP shortly after his book was written.

Schlafly was born Aug. 15, 1924, and grew up in Depression-era St. Louis. Her parents were Republican but not politically involved.

Her own activism was born partly out of convenience. With the country involved in World War II during her college years, Schlafly worked the graveyard shift at the St. Louis Ordnance Plant. Her job included testing ammunition by firing machine guns. She would get off work at 8 a.m., attend morning classes, then sleep in the middle of the day before doing it all over again.

The schedule limited her options for a major. “In order to pick classes to fit my schedule I picked political science,” Schlafly recalled in the 2007 interview.

She graduated from Washington University in 1944, when she was 19. Her first taste of real politics came at age 22, when she guided the 1946 campaign of Republican congressional candidate Claude Bakewell, helping him to a major upset win.

In 1952, with her young family living in nearby Alton, Illinois, Schlafly’s husband, attorney John Schlafly Jr., was approached about running for Congress. He declined, but she ran and narrowly lost in a predominantly Democratic district. She also ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 1970.

Schlafly earned a master’s degree in government from Harvard in 1945. She enrolled in Washington University School of Law in 1976, and at age 51, graduated 27th in a class of 204.

Schlafly received an honorary degree at Washington University’s commencement in 2008. Though some students and faculty silently protested by getting up from their seats and turning their backs to the stage, Schlafly called it “a happy day. I’m just sorry for those who tried to rain on a happy day.”

Missouri delegate Phyllis Schlafly watches during the second day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Missouri delegate Phyllis Schlafly watches during the second day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Citing Schlafly’s views about homosexuals, women and immigrants — she was an outspoken opponent of same-sex marriage, abortion rights and loosening U.S. border restrictions — protesters said she went against the most fundamental principles for which the university stood.

Schlafly remained active in conservative politics well into her 80s, when she was still writing a column that appeared in 100 newspapers, doing radio commentaries on more than 460 stations and publishing a monthly newsletter.

Schlafly’s husband died in 1993.

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June 25th, 2016 by Staff Writer

The Select Panel on Infant Lives issued a criminal referral Thursday to New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas detailing possible violations of state and federal law by the University of New Mexico and Southwestern Women’s Options, a late-term abortion clinic.

House Select Investigative Panel on Infant Lives Chair Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., presides over the committee’s investigating Planned Parenthood, Wednesday, March 1, 2016, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

House Select Investigative Panel on Infant Lives Chair Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., presides over the committee’s investigating Planned Parenthood, Wednesday, March 1, 2016, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

According to the Select Panel, Southwestern Women’s Options provides aborted fetal tissue to the University of New Mexico.

In a letter to Balderas, Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), the chairwoman of the House Select Panel on Infant Lives, alleged that the university and the abortion clinic committed “systemic violations of the law” by breaking a federal statute that makes it a felony to make a profit in exchange for human fetal tissue.

“Section 289g-2 requires safeguards be in place, including a concern that too close a relationship might be formed between an abortion clinic and researchers,” Blackburn wrote. “Through its investigation, the Panel has discovered that personnel within UNM’s hospital and medical school have aggressively engaged in expanding abortion in New Mexico through the offices, personnel, and resources of UNM.”

Blackburn also wrote that the university and the abortion clinic may have violated New Mexico’s Spradling Act, which forbids providing aborted fetal body parts “anatomical gifts.”

“Documentation obtained by the Panel in the course of our investigation reflects the transfer of fetal tissue from Southwestern Women’s Options to UNM for research purposes is a systematic violation of New Mexico’s Spradling Act,” Blackburn added. “These violations occurred as UNM personnel procured fetal tissue from patients at Southwestern Women’s Options for research by UNM entities.”

James Hallinan, a spokesperson for Balderas, confirmed that the AG’s office is reviewing the information provided by the select panel.

“We can confirm the Office of the Attorney General has received a public referral and this matter is under review,” Hallinan told TheBlaze. “All complaints received by the Office of the Attorney General are fully reviewed and appropriate action is taken.”

A spokesman for the panel’s Democratic minority did not immediately return TheBlaze’s request for comment.

Former House Speaker John Boehner authorized the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Select Investigative Panel on Infant Lives last year to investigate allegations raised by a series of undercover videos that Planned Parenthood, the nation’s largest abortion provider, was profiting from the sale of aborted fetal body parts to researchers. Spokespersons for Planned Parenthood have denied illegal conduct.


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June 24th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Senior Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald became the subject of some criticism Thursday afternoon after taking to Twitter to say Republicans are working to ensure “people like” Osama bin Laden can purchase firearms easily.

“Osama bin Laden was on the terrorist watch list,” the contributing editor tweeted. “GOP is fighting to make sure that people like him can buy guns without any inconvenience.”

Osama bin Laden was on the terrorist watch list. GOP is fighting to make sure that people like him can buy guns without any inconvenience.

— Kurt Eichenwald (@kurteichenwald) June 23, 2016

Eichenwald’s post comes after a 25-hour sit-in by Democrats who were pushing for a vote on gun control measures ended. The House Democrats were seeking to force House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) to hold a vote on a bipartisan amendment, proposed by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and backed by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), that would have barred anyone on the “no fly” or “selectee” lists from buying guns.

It took only minutes for one Twitter user, identified as “Smittie,” to point out that bin Laden was not a citizen and, therefore, “couldn’t buy [a gun] anyways.”

“Please tell me you’re not Ivy League educated,” he added.

At that, many more social media observers piled on Eichenwald for his comment.

.@kurteichenwald Journalists have been placed on the watch list for writing things the administration didn’t like. You want that?

— Bob Owens (@bob_owens) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald please don’t tweet anymore

— Stocks (@Bmac0507) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald There is so much stupid here, I don’t even know where to begin.

— ((((Mysterion)))) (@PornPops69) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald Osama Bin Laden was an American citizen with 5th amendment protected right of due process? I didnt know that. Wow @McRibz

— Keith Larson (@KPL2383) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald 3) He trained his guys to use box cutters & planes. This list is meaningless. Much like your tweet.

— (((Renegade Bagel))) (@TheBagel16) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald Oh the stupid hurts.

— David (@AngryDingo) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald Oh Kurt. He wasn’t a citizen , not entitled to Due Process rights like this one. This is beneath you.

— spongeworthy (@spongeworthy2) June 23, 2016


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Posted in Al Qaeda, GOP, Gun Control, Media, Newsweek, Orlando Shooting, Osama bin Laden, Paul Ryan, Politics, Radical Islam, Republicans, Terrorism, Twitter

April 6th, 2016 by Staff Writer

A Reuters poll out today shows Texas Sen. Ted Cruz tied nationally with businessman Donald Trump among Republican voters.

Cruz has 35.2 percent support compared to Trump’s 39.5 percent support, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll released today. The poll’s margin of error is 4.8 percentage points. A March 28 Reuters poll also showed the two candidates tied nationally.

The statistical dead heat shows a significant leap in national support for Cruz, who trailed Trump by 20 points last month in the same poll. Trump has remained on top of the Reuters poll since July 2015, except for when neurosurgeon Ben Carson briefly tied him in December.

Still, Trump remains about 8 percentage points above Cruz nationally in the Real Clear Politics polling average.

RCP Poll Average for Republican Presidential Nomination | InsideGov

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March 4th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Fox News Republican Debate

Fox News Republican Debate

The Fox News Republican debate featured the only four Republican candidates left. The frontrunner of the GOP party, Donald Trump, spent the majority of the night fighting attacks. Trump won 7 out of the 11 states on Super Tuesday.

 

Here are 5 key moments to take away from the debate:

1. Size matters?

 According to a statement made by Marco Rubio on Thursday night, Donald Trump is the one who “deserved” to be attacked, because he dishes it out the most.
Trump’s insecurity about the size of his hands was brought up last week by John Oliver, insinuating that this insecurity has something to do with the size of his penis. This joke about Trump’s hands became a focal point for his rival Marco Rubio, as he uses every chance he gets to shoot insults back to Trump.
This showed true once again on Thursday night, where Rubio and Trump began the debate with a literal dick-measuring contest. This caused Trump to put up his hands and say:
“Look at those hands. Are they small hands? And he referred to my hands – if they’re small, something else must be small. I guarantee you there’s no problem, I guarantee.”
Minutes later, Trump referred to Rubio as “this little guy”:

 

RUBIO: I have a policy question for you, sir. Let’s see if he answers it.

TRUMP: I will. Don’t worry about it, Marco. Don’t worry about it. Don’t worry about it little Marco, I will.

RUBIO: Let’s hear big Donald.

TRUMP: Don’t worry about it, little Marco.

 

2. Trump gets gotchya’d by Fox

Fox was trying to keep Trump accountable, as they had come up with multiple graphics that called out his flawed budget balancing math.

FOX NEWS: Mr. Trump, your proposed tax cut would add $10 trillion to the nation’s debt over 10 years, even if the economy grows the way that you say it will. You make up for a good deal of that, you say, by cutting waste, fraud, and abuse.

TRUMP: Correct.

FOX NEWS: Like what, hand please be specific.

TRUMP: Department of Education. We’re cutting Common Core. We’re getting rid of Common Core. We’re bringing education locally. Department of Environmental Protection. We are going to get rid are of it in almost every form.

We’re going to have little tidbits left but we’re going to take a tremendous amount out. We have various other things. If you look at the IRS. If you look at every single agency, we can cut it down and I mean really cut it down and save. The waste, fraud, and abuse is massive.

[…]

FOX NEWS: But Mr. Trump, your numbers don’t add up. The Education Department, you talk about cutting, the total budget for the Education Department is $78 billion. And that includes Pell grants for low income students and aid to states for special education – I assume you wouldn’t cut those things. The entire budget for the EPA, the Environmental Protection Agency, $8 billion. The deficit this year is $544 billion. That’s more than a half trillion dollars. Your numbers don’t add up, sir.

Trying to back up his math, Trump argued that Medicare would be able to save billions of drug prices were negotiated properly. However, Fox followed that with a rebuttal as well.

“You sahat medicare could save $300 billion a year negotiating lower drug prices. But medicare total only spends $78 billion a year on drugs. Sir, that’s the facts. You are talking about saving more money on medicare,” Fox News Moderator Chris Wallace said.

3. Trump is a world class businessman, according to Trump

Ted Cruz repeatedly attacked Trump on Thursday for his previous support for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential run and Jimmy Carter’s campaign. In response to that, Trump stated that it was all for business, claiming that he is a “world class businessman,” he said citing a “recent article somewhere.” That article he was citing, though, was one where he made a statement in.

TRUMP: All of a sudden all I hear for is that I have been involved in Washington. I have been supporting people for many years. And these people have been politicians and they have been on both sides, Democrats, Republicans, liberals, conservatives. I have supported everybody. Because, until recently, I wasn’t a politician, and I hope maybe you don’t all consider me a politician right now. I hate the term politician. But I have been supporting politicians.

A recent article somewhere said Donald Trump is a world class businessman who goes out and he does get along with everybody. I’ve supported Democrats, and I’ve supported Republicans.

4. Then they all did some yoga

With all of the interruptions between Cruz, Trump, and Rubio, Cruz tried to “calm” Trump’s interruptions by telling him to breathe. This lead to a joke about yoga made by Rubio.

CRUZ: Donald, please, I know it’s hard not to interrupt. Try.

TRUMP: It’s not what you said in the op-ped.

CRUZ: Breathe, breathe, breathe.

TRUMP: I am, Ted.

CRUZ: You can do it. You can breathe. I know it’s hard. I know it’s hard. But just —

RUBIO: When they’re done with the yoga, can I answer a question?

TRUMP: I really hope we don’t see yoga on this stage.

RUBIO: He’s very flexible, so you never know.

5. Rubio (sorta) endorses Trump

The last question that was given to all of the candidates, was whether or not they would support Trump if he became the nominee.

FOX NEWS: It has been a long time since our last debate, seven months have transpired and an RNC pledge that all of you signed agreeing to support the party’s nominee and not launch an independent run. Tonight, can you say you can support the nominee, even if it is Donald Trump.

RUBIO: I will support the Republican nominee. Because the Democrats have two people left in the race. One of them is a socialist. America doesn’t want to be a socialist country. If you want to be, then move to a socialist country. The other one is under FBI investigation. And not only under FBI investigation, she lied to the families of the victims Benghazi and anyone who lies to family victims will never be the commander in chief.

Every candidate on stage Thursday night said they would support Trump as a nominee. However, with the way things are going, it is more likely than not that they will end up having to endorse Trump as a nominee; whether they like it or not.

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Republican Party, Republicans, Uncategorized

February 19th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Donald Trump is Lying Again

His TRUE Feelings on the Iraq War

Donald Trump is lying about his feelings on the Iraq War. The Republican runner has said numerous times that he understands foreign policy better than the rest of the Republican field, because he says he has opposed the Iraq War from the start. However, no one has been able to find anything to support Trump’s statement of an earlier opposition. It is clear that he opposed the Iraq War later on, but not before.

Donald Trump is lying

What individuals were able to find is that Trump did in fact take a position on the Iraq War before the U.S. invasion. However, it just wasn’t the position he said he had. In 2002, Trump appeared on The Howard Stern Show and made this statement:

Stern: Are you for invading Iraq?

Trump: Yeah, I guess so. I wish the first time it was done correctly.

The actual clip can be heard here.

While this would pose as a problem for a normal candidate, people are skeptical on whether or not this will cause a blow to the Trump campaign. He has been blatantly lying throughout, and has been able to get away with it.

 

 

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, Republican Party, Republicans, Uncategorized

February 11th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Following Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump’s strong first-place finish in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R) has one name in mind as the billionaire’s most formidable opponent for the GOP nomination.

“Ted Cruz is in excellent position to be Trump’s major competitor,” Gingrich, who ran for president in 2012, wrote Wednesday on Facebook.

ed Cruz speaks to his supporters at a primary night gathering, held at Alpine Grove Banquet facility, Feb. 9, 2016. (Getty Images/Kayana Szymczak)

ed Cruz speaks to his supporters at a primary night gathering, held at Alpine Grove Banquet facility, Feb. 9, 2016. (Getty Images/Kayana Szymczak)

But Gingrich said Trump won “decisively with every group” and is still most likely to be the Republican Party’s nominee for president.

Gingrich added that Republican presidential candidate John Kasich’s “strategy of staying positive” was successful in the Granite State and that fellow GOP hopeful Marco Rubio “suffered” from attacks by Republican rival Chris Christie, who dropped out of the race Wednesday.

See the rest of Gingrich’s Facebook note below:

Here are my top 5 takeaways from the #NHPrimary. What did you think? What do you think will happen next in South…

Posted by Newt Gingrich on Wednesday, February 10, 2016

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Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, Newt Gingrich, Politics, Republicans, Ted Cruz

February 10th, 2016 by Staff Writer

New Hampshire Primary

New Hampshire primaryIn the New Hampshire primary tonight, Gov. John Kasich from Ohio finished second. 23 percent of the votes are counted, and he has 15 percent of he vote. This puts Kasich behind Trump, who has 34 percent of the vote.

 

Up until this point, Kasich has not been considered as a front runner. That being said, on paper he looks like he could be a great candidate. He is Republican and governor of one of the nation’s most important swing states, and has experience in Congress and the private sector.

 

All of this being said, New Hampshire has a history of nominating moderate Republicans, because they are a state that allows independents to vote in the Republican race. In previous years, New Hampshire has been behind John McCain (2008) and Mitt Romney (2012). Following that pattern, voters allowed for Kasich to make it into the top of the Republican race. Moving forward, his big challenge is going to be maintaining and moving upwards from his success in New Hampshire in the more conservative states ahead.

 

 

 

 

John Kasich
Photo by Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images

operation.

 

Full article

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Republican Party, Republicans, Uncategorized

December 21st, 2015 by Staff Writer

Former Alaska Gov. and Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin likened the GOP-run Congress to “our abuser” and those who voted for them to a “battered wife” in a column for Breitbart published Saturday.

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

“They did it again,” Palin wrote, referring to the just-signed $1.1 trillion Omnibus spending bill. “But like a battered wife, we keep going back because every four years they bring us flowers, beg our forgiveness, and swear they’ll never hit us again.”

“The GOP establishment in Congress is our abuser. We can’t hide the black eyes any more. The whole neighborhood knows,” Palin continued. “The Democrats are gloating. Obama thanked Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) effusively – and why shouldn’t he? Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) couldn’t have given him more.”

More from Palin:

And where was the famed House Freedom Caucus – those stalwart conservatives who spearheaded Boehner’s ouster? They were shrugging and handing us a bag of frozen peas to put on our black eye. If we’re lucky, maybe they’ll call 911 for us when the beating starts up again.

This is shameful, and it has to end. No mas!

For the last seven years, grassroots conservatives rallied to action under the belief that change starts at the ballot box. As I’ve said many times: there is nothing wrong with this country that a good old-fashioned election can’t fix.

People put their own lives on hold to send these Republicans to Congress to take back control of the House and Senate, to get a handle on our bankrupt federal government, and put America on the right track. I think of all the cross-country redeye flights I took away from my young son in order to campaign for Republican candidates, so full of promises, over the years. Others gave up a lot more than I did to elect a “conservative” majority.

Together, we grassroots conservatives gave the GOP historic electoral victories because they promised us they would stop Obama’s “fundamental transformation of America.”

Instead, they abetted it. They are Obama’s accomplices.

Palin went on to say that with Omnibus bill, the Republican Congress “broke every promise they made to us. Every single one. They’ve reached a level of brazen duplicity previously known only to Democrats.”

“This is why people hate politics and politicians,” she later wrote. “This is why they tune out and stay home. Reading through chunks of this bloated spending bill that drives us further into bankruptcy I steamed, ‘That’s it. They can’t be trusted. I’m outta here because they do not stand on the planks of the GOP platform, not one iota.’”

Palin then claimed that the “GOP establishment” actually wants conservative voters to “leave the Party or just sit out elections” to make their political lives easier — and that the elected body “doesn’t care about winning national elections. As far as they’re concerned, Hillary can have the White House – just so long as they can keep their cushy jobs on Capitol Hill.”

The former governor added that a Democratic president gives the GOP an easy excuse to not lead while keeping “all the crony capital cash” as well as “the perks of office” while the “country continues to crash and burn.”

Palin’s conclusion:

Thankfully, not everyone with an “R” after their name is happy with the corrupt status quo. And there are a lot more good guys in Congress now thanks to the Tea Party.

So, no, it’s not time to leave the GOP. We’re going to make our abusers leave.

We’re not going to let them hit us again.

It’s time to kick our abusers out of the House, change the locks, and keep a loaded shotgun next to the bed.

(H/T: The Huffington Post)

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Posted in Congress, GOP, Politics, Republicans, Sarah Palin

December 21st, 2015 by Staff Writer

Former Alaska Gov. and Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin likened the GOP-run Congress to “our abuser” and those who voted for them to a “battered wife” in a column for Breitbart published Saturday.

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

“They did it again,” Palin wrote, referring to the just-signed $1.1 trillion Omnibus spending bill. “But like a battered wife, we keep going back because every four years they bring us flowers, beg our forgiveness, and swear they’ll never hit us again.”

“The GOP establishment in Congress is our abuser. We can’t hide the black eyes any more. The whole neighborhood knows,” Palin continued. “The Democrats are gloating. Obama thanked Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) effusively – and why shouldn’t he? Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) couldn’t have given him more.”

More from Palin:

And where was the famed House Freedom Caucus – those stalwart conservatives who spearheaded Boehner’s ouster? They were shrugging and handing us a bag of frozen peas to put on our black eye. If we’re lucky, maybe they’ll call 911 for us when the beating starts up again.

This is shameful, and it has to end. No mas!

For the last seven years, grassroots conservatives rallied to action under the belief that change starts at the ballot box. As I’ve said many times: there is nothing wrong with this country that a good old-fashioned election can’t fix.

People put their own lives on hold to send these Republicans to Congress to take back control of the House and Senate, to get a handle on our bankrupt federal government, and put America on the right track. I think of all the cross-country redeye flights I took away from my young son in order to campaign for Republican candidates, so full of promises, over the years. Others gave up a lot more than I did to elect a “conservative” majority.

Together, we grassroots conservatives gave the GOP historic electoral victories because they promised us they would stop Obama’s “fundamental transformation of America.”

Instead, they abetted it. They are Obama’s accomplices.

Palin went on to say that with Omnibus bill, the Republican Congress “broke every promise they made to us. Every single one. They’ve reached a level of brazen duplicity previously known only to Democrats.”

“This is why people hate politics and politicians,” she later wrote. “This is why they tune out and stay home. Reading through chunks of this bloated spending bill that drives us further into bankruptcy I steamed, ‘That’s it. They can’t be trusted. I’m outta here because they do not stand on the planks of the GOP platform, not one iota.’”

Palin then claimed that the “GOP establishment” actually wants conservative voters to “leave the Party or just sit out elections” to make their political lives easier — and that the elected body “doesn’t care about winning national elections. As far as they’re concerned, Hillary can have the White House – just so long as they can keep their cushy jobs on Capitol Hill.”

The former governor added that a Democratic president gives the GOP an easy excuse to not lead while keeping “all the crony capital cash” as well as “the perks of office” while the “country continues to crash and burn.”

Palin’s conclusion:

Thankfully, not everyone with an “R” after their name is happy with the corrupt status quo. And there are a lot more good guys in Congress now thanks to the Tea Party.

So, no, it’s not time to leave the GOP. We’re going to make our abusers leave.

We’re not going to let them hit us again.

It’s time to kick our abusers out of the House, change the locks, and keep a loaded shotgun next to the bed.

(H/T: The Huffington Post)

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Posted in Congress, GOP, Politics, Republicans, Sarah Palin

November 19th, 2015 by Staff Writer

The majority of Americans side with Republicans and oppose the White House’s plan to accept an additional 10,000 Syrian refugees without religious screening, a new Bloomberg poll found.

The poll, which was released Wednesday, found that 53 percent of Americans don’t want refugees resettled in the United States; 28 percent said they agreed with President Barack Obama’s plan, while another 11 percent said that only Christian refugees should be allowed into the U.S.

People are assisted after arriving from Turkey on a raft onto the island of Lesbos on October 16, 2015. (Getty Images/Spencer Platt)

People are assisted after arriving from Turkey on a raft onto the island of Lesbos Oct. 16. (Getty Images/Spencer Platt)

The results were even more telling when broken down among party lines.

The poll found that 69 percent of Republican do not want the U.S. to resettle any Syrian refugees, while just 12 percent said the president’s plan should proceed.

Democrats, on the other hand, are much less in agreement with one another, as 46 percent said Syrian refugees should be resettled, while 36 percent dissented.

However, both parties largely agreed that Islam is an “inherently peaceful” religion. Overall, only 28 percent agreed that Islam is not inherently peaceful.

The poll also found that Americans are split in their confidence that the U.S. has enough safeguards in place to prevent a Paris-like attack — 48 percent said they are confident, while 46 percent said they are not.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter and Facebook:
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Posted in Democrats, Islam, Paris Attacks, Poll, Refugee Crisis, Republicans, Syria, US

November 2nd, 2015 by Staff Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican presidential candidates have agreed on a series of demands giving them greater control of debates, as the GOP’s frustrated 2016 class works to inject changes into the nominating process.

They are attempting to wrestle command from the Republican National Committee and media hosts.

Representatives from more than a dozen campaigns met behind closed doors for nearly two hours Sunday night in suburban Washington, a meeting that was not expected to yield many results given the competing interests of several candidates. Yet they emerged having agreed to several changes to be outlined in a letter to debate hosts in the coming days.

(AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

(AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

They include largely bypassing the RNC in coordinating with network hosts, mandatory opening and closing statements, an equal number of questions for the candidates, and pre-approval of on-screen graphics, according to Ben Carson campaign manager Barry Bennett, who hosted the meeting.

“The amazing part for me was how friendly the meeting was,” Bennett said, noting the private gathering was held in a private room marked “family meeting.” “Everybody was cordial. We all agreed we need to have these meetings more regularly.”

The GOP’s most recent debate, moderated by CNBC in Boulder, Colorado, on Wednesday night, drew harsh criticism from campaigns and GOP officials alike. Afterward, some candidates complained that the questions were not substantive enough; others wanted more air time or the chance to deliver opening and closing statements.

GOP chairman Reince Priebus decided to suspend a partnership with NBC News and its properties on a debate set for February, but that wasn’t enough to satisfy the frustrated campaigns.

“We need to mature in the way that we do these debates if they’re going to be useful to the American people,” Carson told ABC’s “This Week.”

While the campaigns agreed to the changes in principle Sunday night, the media companies that host the debates are under no obligation to adopt them. Bennett suggested that campaigns could boycott debates to get their way.

“The only leverage we have is to not come,” he said.

The pushback comes despite a high-profile effort by the Republican National Committee to improve the debate process going into the 2016 election season. The party said the 2012 debate schedule promoted too much fighting among candidates, so for 2016, the RNC dramatically reduced the number of debates for this election and played a leading role in coordinating network hosts and even moderators, in some cases.

Three debates remain before the first nomination contest, the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 1; the next one is scheduled for Nov. 10 in Las Vegas. The RNC has sanctioned five debates after the caucuses.

“What it really comes down to is the candidates want to have more control of the ability to negotiate with the networks,” Donald Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski said after the meeting.

While organizers of the meeting were not including the RNC, the party has been in regular communication with campaigns about their concerns.

Shortly before the meeting, the RNC appointed Sean Cairncross, the committee’s chief operating officer, to take the lead in negotiating with the networks. It’s unclear, however, what role he’ll play should the campaigns get their way.

“This is the first step in the process of understanding what the candidates want, and then we need to have a more specific conversation about NBC,” RNC chief strategist Sean Spicer said Sunday ahead of the meeting. “We need to start a process. Tonight’s the first step.”

Some candidates are trying to use the debate discord to their advantage — none more than Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

Campaigning in Iowa this weekend, he slammed the CNBC debate moderators for asking questions in a way that he said “illustrate why the American people don’t trust the media.” He was cheered after calling for future debates to be moderated by conservatives such as radio host Rush Limbaugh.

Associated Press writer Jill Colvin in New York contributed to this report.

Follow Dave Urbanski (@DaveVUrbanski) on Twitter

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Posted in Campaign 2016, GOP Debate, Politics, Republican Party, Republicans, RNC

October 23rd, 2015 by Staff Writer

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) formally announced Thursday evening his candidacy for House speaker, saying he was “ready and eager” to serve in the leadership post.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Wisconsin Republican made the announcement in a letter to members of the House Republican Conference:

Dear Colleague:

Over the past few days, I’ve been thinking a lot about our country, and it’s clear to me that we’re in a very serious moment. Working families continue to fall behind, and they are losing faith in the American Idea: the belief that if you work hard and play by the rules, you can get ahead. At the same time, a weaker America has led to a more dangerous world. Our friends and rivals alike wonder whether we will pull ourselves out of this stupor.

 Instead of rising to the occasion, Washington is falling short—including the House of Representatives. We are not solving the country’s problems; we are only adding to them. 

But now, we have an opportunity to turn the page, to start with a clean slate, and to rebuild what has been lost. We can make the House a more open and inclusive body—one where every member can contribute to the legislative process. We can rally House Republicans around a bold agenda that will tackle the country’s problems head on. And we can show the country what a commonsense conservative agenda looks like. 

That’s why I’m actually excited for this moment. I’ve spoken with many of you over the past few days, and I can sense the hunger in our conference to get to work. I know many of you want to show the country how to fix our tax code, how to rebuild our military, how to strengthen the safety net, and how to lift people out of poverty. I know you’re willing to work hard and get it done, and I think this moment is ripe for real reform.

That’s because, whatever our differences, we’re all conservatives. We were elected to defend the constitution. We share the same principles. We all believe America is the land of opportunity—the place where you should be able to go as far as your talents and hard work will take you. We all believe in empowering every person to realize his or her potential. And we have the know-how to apply these principles to the problems of today.

I never thought I’d be speaker. But I pledged to you that if I could be a unifying figure, then I would serve—I would go all in. After talking with so many of you, and hearing your words of encouragement, I believe we are ready to move forward as a one, united team. And I am ready and eager to be our speaker. 

This is just the beginning of our work. There is a long road ahead. So let’s get started.

Sincerely, 

Paul Ryan

House leadership had urged Ryan to run after Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) suddenly dropped his bid.

Ryan, who was the Republican nominee for vice president in 2012, had previously said he was not interested in the job. However, after reconsidering, he announced he would serve if several conditions were met.

One of top conditions was that he be endorsed by every major Republican conference. Despite not earning the formal endorsement of the rebellious House Freedom Caucus, the hardline conservative group offered its support via a supermajority.

Ryan is expected to easily have enough votes to become the next speaker.

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Posted in Congress, Government, House of Representatives, Paul Ryan, Politics, Republicans

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