Category: NYPD

July 16th, 2017 by Staff Writer

A New York teen who blasted the rap song “F**k the Police” from his apartment window as thousands of New York police officers mourned the death of a slain officer has been evicted from his apartment.

According to the New York Post, Super Danny Morales ordered the tenant who lived at the house to kick 16-year-old Julien Rodriguez — the teen accused of blasting the music — and his sister from the house for blasting the anti-cop music.

Morales’ reasoning? Because the music was “disrespectful” toward the mourning police.

“I called him and told him he needs to take care of this right away,” Morales told his tenant, he told the Post. “I told him it’s disrespectful and they can’t be doing this. The police lost a family member. We all need to come together and respect that.”

The apartment’s tenant, who only identified himself as “Jesus” to the Post, told the newspaper that Rodriguez and his sister are already gone. He described the pair as “lowlives.”

“They’re gone. The case is closed. They’re no longer in my house. I don’t know where they went,” he told the Post.

Rodriguez made headlines earlier this week when he blasted the famed NWA song during the funeral for slain NYPD officer Miosotis Familia, who was assassinated earlier this month while sitting in a police vehicle in the Bronx. The 16-year-old told the Post that blasting the music to disrespect the cops was a “satisfying” experience.

“Since they did not show respect for my brother and my friend, why should I show respect to them?” he told the Post.

Rodriguez only ceased playing the music when 20 police officers came to his apartment door and pleaded with him to stop the music.

From the Post:

About 20 officers went up to the apartment to try to halt the music, with one cop speaking to the teen in Spanish about his own time growing up as a Latino in the city, law enforcement sources said.

The teen told The Post that he eventually apologized to the cops — but only because the building super threatened to toss his family out of their home if he didn’t.

It’s not clear where the brother and sister have ended up since being booted from their apartment.

Posted in NYPD, US

July 12th, 2017 by Staff Writer

For the second time of New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio’s tenure, police officers of the NYPD turned their back to him in a show of contempt Tuesday at a funeral for a police officer.

Many #nypd officers turned their backs as #DeBlasio spoke #funeral #MiosotisFamilia @ChasingNews @fox5ny @FOX29philly pic.twitter.com/7iJ9vW0Pkr

— Sibile Marcellus (@ChasingSibile) July 11, 2017

Police were outraged when De Blasio chose to fly off to protest the G20 economic summit rather than stay home and attend an evening vigil honoring slain NYPD Officer Miosotis ­Familia at the 46th Precinct station house.

Familia was killed in what many described as an “assassination” when 34-year-old Alexander Bonds walked to her patrol car and shot her in the head without warning. He was chased down and killed by police.

Relations between the NYPD and De Blasio had already been strained after he appeared to support Black Lives Matter protests against the police.

The killer, Bonds, had posted anti-police rhetoric on social media prior to the assassination, prompting many to conclude that he had been radicalized by the kind of narratives pushed by Black Lives Matter.

“Mr. Mayor, you didn’t have to travel to Germany for a protest,” said Sergeants Benevolent Association president Ed Mullins. “All you had to do is speak in front of the men and women of the NYPD.”

Video from social media shows the police turning back around after De Blasio finished his address at the funeral.

VIDEO: Mayor de Blasio finishes speaking and cops at #MiosotisFamilia‘s funeral who had turned their backs on him turn back around. pic.twitter.com/38325VTxO0

— Matthew Chayes (@chayesmatthew) July 11, 2017

His actions drew wide condemnation, including that from the New York Post, whose cover declared him a “Deutsch bag,” explaining, “Mayor feeds his ego in Germany after fleeing a city in mourning.”

The New York Daily News reported that hundreds of officers turned away from De Blasio.

On Tuesday morning, a New York City police officer who was shot and killed while sitting inside her police vehicle last week was laid to rest. Officer Miosotis Familia was remembered on Monday at a Bronx church for her smiles and kindness. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner James O'Neill joined members of the rank and file as well as neighborhood residents, to pay their respects to the fallen officer. Familia was writing in her memo book early last Wednesday when a man walked up to the police vehicle where she was sitting and fired. The shooter, Alexander Bonds, was shot dead by police soon after the attack.

Posted in Bill de Blasio, Black Lives Matter, New York City, NYPD, police officer, Politics

September 23rd, 2016 by Staff Writer

The latest sexting allegations against Anthony Weiner have led the FBI and the New York Police Department to open investigations into the embattled former congressman, according to a Thursday report.

Law enforcement officials told CNN that prosecutors in U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara’s office have issued a subpoena for Weiner’s cell phone and other records after he was accused of engaging in sexual correspondence with a 15-year-old girl. In addition to the federal agency, the NYPD has also launched a preliminary investigation into Weiner’s supposed activity.

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The most recent sexting allegations where first presented by the Daily Mail, which reported that Weiner engaged in explicit communication with a minor, whose name has not been disclosed, around January and continued his talks with her until July.

In their communications, it was reported Weiner asked the young girl to undress via Skype and also sent her inappropriate and pornographic images and videos. The Daily Mail also reported the two would discuss his “rape fantasy” while roleplaying as a teacher and a school girl.

According to the report, the 15 year old reached out to Weiner in January over Twitter. However, Weiner, for his part, has neither confirmed nor denied the alleged conversations.

“I have repeatedly demonstrated terrible judgment about the people I have communicated with online and the things I have sent,” he said in a statement. “I am filled with regret and heartbroken for those I have hurt.”

In an additional comment to CNN, Weiner said this: “While I have provided the Daily Mail with information showing that I have likely been the subject of a hoax, I have no one to blame but me for putting myself in this position. I am sorry.”

As a result of his multiple inappropriate internet relationships, Weiner’s wife, Huma Abedin, announced last month she is separating from him.


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Posted in Anthony Weiner, Crime, FBI, NYPD, Politics

September 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

A man attacked a police officer with a meat cleaver near New York’s Penn Station Thursday before being shot by police, according to a statement from law enforcement officials.

The officers shot the suspect, Queens resident 32-year-old Akram Joudah, multiple times around 5 p.m. as he chased police with an 11-inch meat cleaver after being caught trying to remove a boot from his car, incoming New York Police Department Commissioner James O’Neill told reporters.

8-9 Shots fired and 3 people taken away in ambulances; 1 is allegedly a police officer West 32nd Street NYC pic.twitter.com/dOBw1WMwBw

— Christopher N. Okada (@ChrisOkada) September 15, 2016

One off-duty detective was in serious condition after Joudah slashed him, resulting in a six-inch cut from the law enforcement official’s temple to his jaw. The detective and two other injured officers were taken to nearby Bellevue Hospital for treatment, along with the suspect, who was described by sources as an “emotionally disturbed person.” He is in stable but critical condition, police said.

“He did what we would want any New York City police officer to do: self-engage,” outgoing NYPD Commissioner David Bratton said of the off-duty detective.

Peter Donald, spokesman for the NYPD, confirmed on Twitter that the shooting took place in Midtown Manhattan at 32nd Street and Broadway, near the well-known Madison Square Garden.

Police fired 18 shots at the suspect after officers failed in their attempt to Taser him. Joudah climbed on top of a police cruiser and slashed the detective, who tried to tackle him, before the officers opened fire.

Jonathan Schneier, a bystander who witnessed the altercation, said he was on his way to get a cup of coffee when he saw the man holding the butcher’s knife, surrounded by several officers ordering him to drop the weapon.

“I give credit to the police officers,” he said. “They gave him many opportunities.”

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Posted in Crime, New York City, NYPD, Police shootings, Video, watch

September 1st, 2016 by Staff Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City might never tell the public if the police officer at the center of the Eric Garner chokehold death case is disciplined, the mayor and police commissioner indicated this week after reaching a new interpretation of a 40-year-old state civil rights law.

Garner said nearly a dozen times that he couldn't breathe while on the ground. (Image source: YouTube)

Garner said nearly a dozen times that he couldn’t breathe while on the ground. (Image source: YouTube)

The New York Police Department recently ended a longstanding practice of letting reporters see a rundown of disciplinary actions, saying officials had concluded it violated the law.

Asked Tuesday whether the new stance would apply to the officer who put his arm around Garner’s neck in a case that helped fuel the Black Lives Matter movement, Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio said officials “have to honor state law.”

Citing the mayor’s comments, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Wednesday the results of any potential disciplinary trial against Officer Daniel Pantaleo “would not be publicly available,” though he predicted they probably would eventually “get out” somehow.

Any disciplinary moves won’t happen until federal prosecutors decide whether to bring civil rights charges against Pantaleo, whom a state grand jury declined to indict. But the discussion is illuminating open-government advocates’ concerns about the NYPD’s new legal position on disciplinary records.

Caught partly on video, Garner’s fatal 2014 encounter with Pantaleo made “I can’t breathe!” a rallying cry in protests and national debate over policing, brutality and race. Garner, who had refused to be handcuffed as police tried to arrest him on charges of selling loose cigarettes, was black; Pantaleo is white.

Police told the Daily News Garner suffered cardiac arrest and died at a local hospital. (Image source: YouTube)

Police told the Daily News Garner suffered cardiac arrest and died at a local hospital. (Image source: YouTube)

The medical examiner ruled Garner’s death a homicide caused partly by a chokehold, a maneuver banned under NYPD policy. Pantaleo’s lawyer, Stuart London, said the officer used a permissible takedown move, not a chokehold, and argued Garner’s poor health was the main reason for his death.

London declined Wednesday to comment on the police department’s new position on disciplinary records, first reported by the Daily News. The Garner family’s lawyer didn’t immediately respond to a message seeking comment.

Bratton said the change came after a recent public records request prompted the department to re-examine a 1976 New York state law. It shields records “used to evaluate performance toward continued employment or promotion” of police, firefighters and correction officers, unless employees release them or a judge orders it.

Open-government advocates have long questioned the law.

“The public employees who have the most power over people’s lives are the least accountable due to (the law) — it should be the reverse,” said Robert Freeman, executive director of the New York State Committee on Open Government.

Bratton said he’d support releasing disciplinary actions if the law allowed it.

But the New York Civil Liberties Union disagrees with the department’s new reading of the law and questions its impetus, associate legal director Christopher Dunn said.

“What we really think is happening here is that the city is taking an increasingly aggressive position attempting to keep information about police discipline away from the public,” he said. “And we think that’s wrong.”

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Posted in Black Lives Matter, Eric Garner, NYPD, US

May 28th, 2016 by Staff Writer

UPDATE 10:15 p.m. ET: 

The pilot, originally reported to have only sustained minor injuries after being rescued, is now being reported as missing, according to the Associated Press.

Though the NJSP said the pilot had been rescued, the NYPD insisted that was not the case. NYPD Deputy Chief Rodney Harrison said the NJSP’s report was “inaccurate.” Scuba divers are now searching for the missing pilot.

A Coast Guard spokesperson said divers will go back into the water at dawn Saturday to try to lift the plane out of the river, according to NBC News.

#Harbor #SCUBA working the scene of the P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft that went down in the Hudson, 2 miles s/o the #GWB pic.twitter.com/hDufwtouiz

— NYPD Special Ops (@NYPDSpecialops) May 28, 2016

The New Jersey State Police has pulled back its statement that the pilot was rescued, saying there were “conflicting reports from scene of plane crash” and can “no longer confirm swimmer in water was pilot.”

A vintage World War II-era fighter plane crashed into the Hudson River, between New York and New Jersey, Friday, and one good samaritan immediately leapt into the water to search for the pilot.

NYPD & @FDNY joint operation ongoing in response to a small plane landing in the Hudson River near 79 St pic.twitter.com/HEbhbbMjX8

— NYPD NEWS (@NYPDnews) May 28, 2016

The exact circumstances of the crash remain unknown, according to New Jersey State Police, but the pilot survived, sustaining only minor injuries.

Actual video of WW2 Thunderbolt crashing in Hudson River, still looking for pilot #nbc4ny pic.twitter.com/LLJPTsAS3U

— Michael George (@mgeorge4NY) May 28, 2016

Unbelievable- just got this video. Good Samaritan dives in water to search for pilot who crashed in Hudson. #nbc4ny pic.twitter.com/k9cbVSG9Ni

— Michael George (@mgeorge4NY) May 28, 2016

In a statement, the Federal Aviation Administration said it received a notification that a World War II-era P-47 Thunderbolt may have gone down in the river, two miles south of the George Washington Bridge, according to ABC News. The statement said the agency sent search and rescue to the scene.

The FAA later added that the aircraft was one of three that departed from Republic Airport on Long Island. The other two planes returned safely to the airport, the FAA said.


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Posted in Airplanes, New Jersey, New York, NYPD, US, Video, watch

February 21st, 2016 by Staff Writer

NEW YORK (TheBlaze/AP) — About 10,000 protesters, some holding signs and other chanting, rallied in New York on Saturday in support of a former police officer convicted for fatally shooting an unarmed man in a darkened stairwell in a public housing building.

Thousands of protesters attend a rally in the Brooklyn borough of New York Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in support of a former NYPD police officer Peter Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter for the 2014 shooting death of Akai Gurley, in a housing project stairwell. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Thousands of protesters attend a rally in the Brooklyn borough of New York Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in support of a former NYPD police officer Peter Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter for the 2014 shooting death of Akai Gurley, in a housing project stairwell. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

The protest in Brooklyn over ex-officer Peter Liang’s manslaughter conviction in the 2014 shooting of Akai Gurley was one of about 30 taking place around the U.S., organizers said. About 2,000 people marched in Philadelphia, according to Philly.com, and about 150 gathered in Ann Arbor, Michigan, according to The Ann Arbor News.

“No scapegoat! No scapegoat!” protesters in New York shouted as the crowd descended on Cadman Plaza, just outside the federal courthouse in Brooklyn. They carried signs reading “No Selective Justice” regarding Liang’s prosecution.

Protesters attend a rally in the Brooklyn borough of New York Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in support of a former NYPD police officer Peter Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter for the 2014 shooting death of Akai Gurley, in a housing project stairwell. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Protesters attend a rally in the Brooklyn borough of New York Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in support of a former NYPD police officer Peter Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter for the 2014 shooting death of Akai Gurley, in a housing project stairwell. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

The 28-year-old Liang, who was fired immediately after a jury convicted him earlier this month, faces up to 15 years in prison.

He testified that the shooting was an accident, firing his gun after being frightened by a noise. Many of his supporters say they believe Liang is being scapegoated because of anger over other police shootings in New York and across the country and that he has been treated unfairly because he is Asian-American. Prosecutors argued that Liang’s actions were reckless and he shouldn’t have had his gun out or the finger on the trigger. They also said he did nothing to help Gurley as he lay dying on the floor.

“We’re here today to let people know that Chinese-Americans count as well,” said protester Don Lee, a candidate for New York’s state Assembly from lower Manhattan.

Lee added, “It is a tragedy that Akai Gurley was shot and killed. … But this tragedy’s been compounded by another tragedy, that Peter Liang, in an accident, is going to go to jail for up to 15 years.”

A few dozen people held a counter-protest in New York on Saturday, held across the street from the larger protest as officers with plastic handcuffs and batons stood between them.

A group of protesters, supporters of former NYPD officer Peter Liang, shout at counter protesters while attending a rally in the Brooklyn borough of New York Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in support of Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter for the 2014 shooting death of Akai Gurley, in a housing project stairwell. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

A group of protesters, supporters of former NYPD officer Peter Liang, shout at counter protesters while attending a rally in the Brooklyn borough of New York Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in support of Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter for the 2014 shooting death of Akai Gurley, in a housing project stairwell. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Soraya Soi Free participated in the counter-protest. She argued that Liang was clearly not a scapegoat because he was tried by a jury of his peers, and she did not approve of the protest supporting him.

“This protest is definitely an insult to Akai Gurley’s family,” she said.

Liang was convicted Feb. 11 on manslaughter and official-misconduct charges. He is scheduled to be sentenced April 14.

Liang’s attorney, Robert Brown, attended the Brooklyn rally and said the community’s support was “very uplifting” to Liang.

New York City police officer Peter Liang is escorted out of court after he was charged with manslaughter, official misconduct and other offenses on February 11, 2015 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

New York City police officer Peter Liang is escorted out of court after he was charged with manslaughter, official misconduct and other offenses on February 11, 2015 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Brown said he is making motions to have the verdict set aside.

Besides the protests in New York, Philadelphia and Michigan, organizers said rallies took place in dozens of other cities in the U.S. Saturday including Los Angeles and San Francisco.

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Posted in NYPD, Police, US, Video, watch

February 12th, 2016 by Staff Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — A rookie police officer who shot an unarmed man dead in a darkened public housing stairwell was convicted Thursday of manslaughter in a case closely watched by advocates for police accountability.

The courtroom audience gasped and Officer Peter Liang, who had broken into tears as he testified about the 2014 shooting of Akai Gurley, buried his head in his hands as the verdict came after 17 hours of jury deliberations. He also was convicted of official misconduct.

The manslaughter charge carries up to 15 years in prison. Liang’s sentencing is set for April 14.

New York City police officer Peter Liang sits in court as testimony is read back for jurors during deliberations in his trial in Brooklyn Supreme Court February 10, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Byron Smith-Pool/Getty Images)

New York City police officer Peter Liang sits in court as testimony is read back for jurors during deliberations in his trial in Brooklyn Supreme Court February 10, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Byron Smith-Pool/Getty Images)

But an uncertainty remains: Brooklyn state Supreme Court Danny Chun has yet to rule on Liang’s lawyers’ request to dismiss the charges. They made it before the verdict, which brought Brooklyn District Attorney Kenneth Thompson to the courtroom audience to watch.

The shooting happened in a year of debate nationwide about police killings of black men, and activists have looked to Liang’s trial as a counterweight to cases in which grand juries have declined to indict officers, including the cases of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York. Like Gurley, Brown and Garner were black and unarmed.

New York City police officer Peter Liang is escorted out of court after he was charged with manslaughter, official misconduct and other offenses on February 11, 2015 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

New York City police officer Peter Liang is escorted out of court after he was charged with manslaughter, official misconduct and other offenses on February 11, 2015 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Meanwhile, supporters of Liang, who is Chinese-American, have said he has been made a scapegoat for past injustices.

Deliberations stretched into Thursday evening, after jurors asked to review the New York Police Department firearms guide late in the afternoon. Earlier, they had reheard testimony from Liang and other witnesses.

Liang was patrolling a public housing high-rise in Brooklyn with his gun drawn when he fired; he said a sound startled him. The bullet ricocheted off a wall and hit the 28-year-old Gurley on a lower floor.

Prosecutors said Liang handled his gun recklessly, must have realized from the noise that someone was nearby and did almost nothing to help Gurley.

“Instead of shining a light, he pointed his gun and shot Akai Gurley,” Brooklyn Assistant District Attorney Joe Alexis said in his closing argument.

But the defense said the shooting was an accident, not a crime.

The 28-year-old Liang said he had been holding his weapon safely, with his finger on the side and not the trigger, when the sudden sound jarred him and his body tensed.

“I just turned, and the gun went off,” he testified.

He said he initially looked with his flashlight, saw no one and didn’t immediately report the shot, instead quarreling with his partner about who would call their sergeant. Liang thought he might get fired.

But then, he said, he went to look for the bullet, heard cries and found the wounded Gurley, with his weeping girlfriend trying to tend to him.

Liang then radioed for an ambulance, but he acknowledged not helping Gurley’s girlfriend try to revive him. Liang explained he thought it was wiser to wait for professional medical aid.

“I was panicking. I was shocked and in disbelief that someone was hit,” said Liang, who said he was so overcome that he needed oxygen as he was taken to a hospital for ringing in his ears.

While Liang’s trial unfolded, two other New York police officers, Patrick Espeut and Diara Cruz, were shot and wounded during a similar stairwell patrol in a different public housing complex. The gunman later killed himself. The judge barred any mention of those shootings in Liang’s trial.

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Posted in Black Lives Matter, NYPD, US

November 5th, 2015 by Staff Writer

Director Quentin Tarantino defended his controversial comments on police violence and contended that the U.S. has a “problem of white supremacy” during an appearance on MSNBC Wednesday night.

The “Kill Bill” director insisted to “All In” host Chris Hayes that he is not a cop hater and merely had his comments taken out of context by those who “want to demonize” him.

“We were at a rally that was dealing with unarmed people, mostly black and brown, who have been shot and killed, or beaten, or strangled by the police, and I was obviously referring to the people in those type of situations,” he said, providing a list of incidents in which he felt black Americans were wrongly killed by police.

Tarantino said he was stunned when police unions blasted him and called for a boycott of his movies.

“…a problem of white supremacy in this country.”

Share:

“I was surprised,” he told Hayes. “I was under the impression I was an american and that I had First Amendment rights and there was no problem with me going to an anti-police brutality protest and speaking my mind. And just because I was at an anti-police brutality protest doesn’t mean I’m anti-police.”

Later in the interview, Tarantino explained how the group that hosted the anti-police brutality protest got in touch with him. While doing so, dropped a comment that raised eyebrows.

“I had made statements in some interviews, you know, along the way, that had suggested that I’m on their side when it comes to this issue of, you know, ultimately what I feel is a problem of white supremacy in this country,” he said.

Throughout the interview, the director took shots at critics, arguing “it’s much easier to feign outrage and start arguments with celebrities than it is to deal” with the problems facing law-enforcement.

Tarantino’s comments at the protest ignited a national firestorm, coming just days after an NYPD officer was gunned down in the line of duty.

“When I see murders, I do not stand by … I have to call the murderers murders,” he said at the demonstration.

As a result, the head of a NYPD union called for a boycott of his movies. The commissioner of the NYPD also blasted Tarantino, telling a radio station that he had “no words to describe the contempt I have for him and his comments.”

Quentin Tarantino Shocks With New Comments on ‘White Supremacy,’ Defends Earlier Remarks on Police

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Posted in Entertainment, NYPD, Quentin Tarantino, US, Video, watch

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