Category: GOP

July 19th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Rush Limbaugh, nationally syndicated conservative radio show host, during the Tuesday broadcast of his show, accused the “Washington establishment” of plotting a “silent coup” in order to oust President Donald Trump.

Limbaugh, discussing Trump’s presidency, claimed that ever since Trump was elected, the established Washington power players “began to circle the wagons,” and from that day forward, Trump was not going to be “allowed to triumph on anything.”

Intimating that success would be by a very narrow margin — if at all — Limbaugh added, “There was no way that this establishment was going to permit an outsider to come in and clean house and show how Washington can work and blow their cover for the last how many decades.”

Limbaugh noted that it doesn’t necessarily mean that a draining of the swamp can’t be done, but that the Washington elite “weren’t going to help this along.”

“They were not going to contribute,” he added. “They were not going to make this easy for Trump.”

The radio host even went as far as to say that the election of Trump “has never been about” the president “unifying the Republican party in order to beat the Democrats.”

“That’s been the mistake,” Limbaugh said. “That’s not the fight here. The fight is Donald Trump and his cadre and you, the Trump base, versus the Washington establishment. It has always been that and nothing more.”

Later during the airing, Limbaugh doubled down on remarks that something nefarious is afoot within the “Washington establishment.”

“We’re in the midst of a silent coup,” he said. “These people are trying to take this president out. And everybody understands that. So why in that circumstance do you think that the same people trying to destroy Donald Trump are going to help him get rid of Obamacare? Are going to help him reform the tax code? They’re not. They are going to have to be defeated, not worked with. There isn’t any cooperation.”

You can listen to the segment in its entirety in the audio below.

Posted in GOP, Media, President Donald Trump, Radio, Rush Limbaugh

July 17th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) doesn’t believe the Senate will repeal Obamacare and pass a health care replacement bill anytime soon. Paul offered the sobering update over the weekend during an appearance on “Fox News Sunday.”

When asked if he believes Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has enough votes to pass an Obamacare replacement, Paul said he doesn’t believe McConnell does.

“You know, I don’t think right now he does,” Paul said.

“The real problem we have is that we won four elections on repealing Obamacare but [the Senate GOP’s replacement bill] keeps most of Obamacare taxes, keeps most of the regulations, keeps most of the subsidies and creates something that Republicans have never been for and that’s a giant insurance bailout superfund,” Paul explained. “That’s not a Republican idea to give taxpayer money to a private industry that already makes $15 billion in profit.”

When asked by show host Chris Wallace what course of action Republicans should take should they fail to pass health care reform, Paul suggested they repeal Obamacare and its taxes, regulations and mandates then worry about passing a replacement bill later.

“What I’ve suggested to the president…if this comes to an impasse, I think if the president jumps into the fray and says ‘Look guys, you promised to repeal it, let’s just repeal what we can agree to,’” Paul explained. “And then we can continue to try to fix, replace or whatever has to happen afterwards.”

“But the one thing we should do is try to repeal as many of the taxes, as many of the regulations and as many of the mandates as we possibly can,” Paul emphasized, noting that he’s optimistic for compromise to come to Senate Republicans.

Paul explained that he can’t currently support the Senate’s health care bill because it keeps the heart of Obamacare alive, which Paul called the bill’s “fundamental flaw.”

“Mandates on insurance cause prices to rise and young, healthy people then say ‘Ill wait until I get sick [to buy insurance].’ And then the insurance pool gets sicker and sicker — it’s called adverse selection, we also call it the ‘death spiral,’” Paul said. “The Republican plan admits that it will continue.”

“The Republican plan doesn’t fix the death spiral of Obamacare, it simply subsidizes it,” Paul explained.

McConnell over the weekend announced that any vote on a health care replacement would be postponed until Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) returns to Washington. McCain is recovering at home in Arizona after undergoing surgery on Friday for a blood clot above his left eye.

.@RandPaul: “I don’t think Republicans should put their name on this [bill].” https://t.co/rE5W333VUU pic.twitter.com/OMPNg9e78k

— Fox News (@FoxNews) July 16, 2017

Posted in Fox News, GOP, Health Care, Obamacare, Politics, Rand Paul, Republicans, Senate, watch

June 15th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Noah Nathan, a bystander identified by PBS Newshour, caught the Alexandria, Virginia shooting on camera Wednesday, and in the video, over least 70 shots can be heard among the panic.

Nathan, who reportedly lives just a block from the Virginia ball field, was walking his dogs when he encountered the incident.

Nathan was clearly panicked as he filmed the shooting, as the camera was shifted crazily every which way. At one point, it would appear that Nathan hit the ground, as the vantage point appears to be from near ground level.

Around the 2:35 mark, Nathan can be heard yelling, “Hey, is that guy OK up there?”

The video gives a candid look at the scene of the shooting which left four people injured, including Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA) and a legislative correspondent from the office of Rep. Roger Williams (R-TX).

Scalise’s office released a statement after he was shot in the hip. The statement claimed that the congressman was in “stable” condition and in “good spirits.”

It was reported that “at least five people,” including Scalise, as well as two Capitol Police officers, were shot during the congressional baseball practice outside Washington, D.C.

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ.) said the gunman, later identified as James Hodgkinson, was carrying “a large gauge rifle.” During the violent fracas, Capitol Police officers fired back at the shooter with pistols, and Hodgkinson later died as a result of injuries sustained in the shootout.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) told Fox News that if not for Capitol Police, “it would have been a massacre.”

Hodgkinson was reportedly a left-wing climate activist who hated Trump and the GOP.

Shouting and panic can be heard throughout the video as people in the vicinity are told repeatedly to “stay down.” It is unclear whether or not the “stay down” directive was for the safety of those in the area, or if Capitol Police were telling the gunman to stay down.

“That’s one hell of a way to start a f**king morning,” Nathan can be heard saying toward the end of the video.

Warning: the following video contains images that some may find disturbing as well as graphic language.

Posted in Baseball, Crime, GOP, Shootings, Videos, viral video, Virginia shooting

May 7th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Following the House successfully voting to repeal Obamacare and replace it with the American Health Care Act, angry Democrats and liberals took to Twitter to mock Republicans with “things Jesus never said.”

In fact, on Friday and Saturday the hashtag “#ThingsJesusNeverSaid” was one of the highest trending topics on Twitter worldwide. At first, the hashtag was used to mock Republicans for allegedly removing the pre-existing conditions provision in Obamacare.

But the hashtag quickly devolved into broader criticisms of President Donald Trump and the Republican Party as a whole.

Users criticized the GOP for being against refugees and immigration, for wanting to replace Obamacare with a market-based solution, for advocating tax reform, for wanting to build a wall on the southern U.S.-Mexico border, among other current American political issues.

One user wrote: “#ThingsJesusNeverSaid ‘You have a pre-existing condition, I can’t cure you.’”

Another added: “‘Build that wall’ #ThingsJesusNeverSaid.”

Even a Catholic priest added to the rhetoric: “‘Blessed are those whose mercy extends only to those who are like them.’ #ThingsJesusNeverSaid.”

But the hashtag works both ways, liberals quickly learned.

Conservatives, Republicans and libertarians on Twitter were quick to hit back with some statements of their own, mostly focusing on the fact that Democrats and liberals alike generally advocate for abortion, which many contend is murder.

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, but before you gestated for nine months you weren’t a human being.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Andrew Klavan (@andrewklavan) May 6, 2017

#ThingsJesusNeverSaid women should have the right to choose to kill their babies.

— Jeb Sanford (@JebSanford) May 6, 2017

“Sure, you can totally kill babies. No problem.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Matt Walsh (@MattWalshBlog) May 6, 2017

“Blessed are the children, unless they are unplanned.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Craigé Schmuckatelli (@CraigR3521) May 6, 2017

“It’s not a baby, it’s just a blob of cells.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— The Morning Spew (@TheMorningSpew) May 6, 2017

While others added other issues to the mix:

#ThingsJesusNeverSaid It totally counts as compassion if you let the government pretend to care for the poor.

— Emily Zanotti (@emzanotti) May 6, 2017

#ThingsJesusNeverSaid: There are 80 different genders.

— Mark Dice (@MarkDice) May 6, 2017

“Marriage is whatever you want it to be.” #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

— Matt Walsh (@MattWalshBlog) May 6, 2017

https://twitter.com/WayneDupreeShow/status/860840482485809153

It must be noted that despite the liberal outrage, the AHCA is not yet law. In fact, the Senate has not even voted on the bill yet, and it’s expected they will pass a different version of the law, complicating the law making process.

Posted in American Health Care ACt, Democrats, GOP, Jesus Christ, Liberals, Obamacare, Politics, Republicans, Twitter

March 10th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) has lead the fight against lukewarm attempts at an Obamacare repeal, and after the GOP submitted a bill that Paul labeled “Obamacare Lite,” and as promised the Kentucky senator has introduced his own bill according to The Hill.

The bill itself is very similar to the same Obamacare repeal bill Republicans voted on unanimously in 2015. Paul argues that when it comes to repealing, the GOP is a unified front, but it’s how to go about with the replacement that they are divided on. His plan is to keep the promise made to voters now, and then tackle replacement.

“[After repeal] we can have a separate vote on replacement legislation that will deliver lower costs, better care, and greater access to the American people,” he said.

The bill is a much cleaner cut of Obamacare than the GOP’s, which plans to replace as it repeals.

The bill includes a staggered repeal of ObamaCare taxes, including a repeal of the Medical Device Tax in 2018 and the Cadillac Tax in 2020.

The legislation would also eliminate eligibility for ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion as of 2020 as well as the higher federal matching rate included in the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) has reportedly introduced the same legislation into the House, as both he and Paul said they would on Tuesday after stating that the GOP version of the bill “will not pass.” 

Turbulence is expected for Paul and Jordan’s bill as moderate Republicans have said they will vote against bill’s that threaten Medicaid expansion in their states. This has been a contentious issue for Paul in the past, as when initial meetings were occurring for the replacement bill, Paul walked out of a meeting in frustration for this very reason.

 

Posted in GOP, Jim Jordan, Obamacare Lite, Obamacare repeal, Politics, Rand Paul

March 8th, 2017 by Staff Writer

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.) defended the “American Health Care Act” introduced to replace Obamacare, calling the former president’s signature legislation a “nightmare” that is about to end. He made the comments in a press conference Tuesday.

“What I want to tell my fellow citizens,” Ryan said in the announcement, “is that the nightmare of Obamacare is about to end. That we are doing what we said we would do in this campaign which is repeal and replace this awful law that is crashing.”

Let me say one more thing. Let’s not forget, Obamacare is collapsing. Obamacare isn’t staying. If we did nothing the law would collapse and leave everybody without affordable health care.

“We are doing an act of mercy,” Ryan continued, “that repealing this law and replacing it with patient-centered healthcare reforms that we as conservatives have been arguing for and fighting for, for years.”

Speaker Paul Ryan: “The nightmare of Obamacare is about to end.” https://t.co/vjZqTA0FOq https://t.co/ecV5mBllSc

— The Lead CNN (@TheLeadCNN) March 7, 2017

“I’m prepared to lead our conference to do what we said we would do in the election,” Ryan said, ostensibly as a way of addressing criticisms that this bill isn’t a full repeal.

We actually ran on a repeal and replace plan. That’s what this is, the repeal and replace plan that we ran on. Now I am intent on making sure we fulfill our promises but I believe in regular order, I believe in going through the process the way it was meant to go through. We didn’t write this bill in my office on Christmas Eve like they did in Harry Reid’s office and then jam it through to an unsuspecting country.

These committees are writing this legislation. These committees will be marking up the legislation tomorrow. And then it goes to the budget committee the next week and then it goes to the rules committee on the floor the week after that, which is regular order.

“So I’m excited that we’re doing this the right way,” Ryan continued in a thinly veiled attack on the Democrats’ healthcare bill, “I’m excited that we’re doing this in plain sight.”

Ryan: “We didn’t write this bill in my office on Christmas Eve…and then jam it through to an unsuspecting country” https://t.co/7mIEtZiDzw

— CNN (@CNN) March 7, 2017

“Let me just give you a list of what’s in here that conservatives should be excited about,” Ryan again addressed criticism from the right.

Number one, it repeals Obamacare. Number two, it repeals the Obamacare taxes, which is a massive tax relief for families for the cost of healthcare. It repeals the Obamacare spending, like the Medicare expansion and the Obamacare subsidies. It repeals the Obamacare mandates on individuals and businesses. It ends funding for Planned Parenthood and sends that money to community health centers.

It has a Medicaid per capita block grant, that’s the biggest entitlement reform anybody has seen here for decades. It nearly doubles the amount of money people can contribute to health savings accounts, that is fundamental part and a crucial part of conservative healthcare policy.

It equalizes the tax treatment of healthcare. I’ve been doing conservative healthcare reform for twenty years. For twenty years, we as conservatives have been arguing for equalizing the tax treatment of healthcare of all Americans so we can have a vibrant, individual health market, so we have choice and competition.

“Look, here’s, there are two ways of fixing healthcare,” Ryan said, laying out what he saw as the philosophical distinction between the GOP bill and Obamacare. “Have the government run it, and ration it, and put price controls. That’s what Obamacare does, that’s what the left wants.”

Or do what conservatives have been arguing for, for years. Have a vibrant free market where people get to do what they want, they buy what they want. Equalize the tax treatment, stop the discrimination in the tax code against people who want to go out in a free market place and buy that health care of their choosing. This does that, this lowers costs, creates competition, and allows choices.

“And the most important thing that this thing does is it takes power out of Washington,” he explained, “it takes power out of the bureaucracy and put its back to doctors and patients where it belongs.”

.@SpeakerRyan lists the reasons conservatives should be excited about #AHCA. pic.twitter.com/nedFno6ZQc

— Fox News (@FoxNews) March 7, 2017

When asked if they would have the necessary votes to pass the bill, Ryan very confidently predicted they would. “We will have 218 votes,” he said without pause. “This is the beginning of the legislative process, we got a few weeks. We’ll have 218 when this thing gets to the floor, I can guarantee you that.

.@SpeakerRyan: “We will have 218 votes” to pass Obamacare repeal and replace plan, “I can guarantee you that.” https://t.co/zjCHDhbJ2V pic.twitter.com/3o3PCQ3IAR

— This Week (@ThisWeekABC) March 7, 2017

Republicans released the text of the “American Health Care Act” Monday to immediate criticism from conservative Republicans who called it “Obamacare lite.” This prompted Charles Krauthammer to opine that if they defeated the bill because it wasn’t conservative enough that it could threaten, and even “destroy” Trump’s presidency.

Posted in American Health Care ACt, GOP, Obamacare, Obamacare Lite, Obamacare repeal, Paul Ryan, Politics

February 12th, 2017 by Staff Writer

During a town hall meeting for Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-Fla.) Saturday morning, a Florida GOP executive chided protesters who continually interrupted the event.

When Pasco County GOP secretary Bill Akins got on stage to speak about the failings of Obamacare, claiming that elderly people go before “death panels” because of the law, the crowd erupted into screams and boos — but Atkins wasn’t having any of it.

“They do. Yes, they do. It’s in there folks. You’re wrong,” Akins can be heard saying over the noise.

“OK, children. Alright, children,” he added, mocking the rowdy crowd.

CNN got video of the incident.

WATCH: At Congressman @RepGusBilirakis town hall – County GOP Chairman Bill Akins refers to adults as “children” when they fact check him. pic.twitter.com/RcaOz0gNOY

— Yashar (@yashar) February 11, 2017

Prior to Obamacare becoming law in 2010 and directly afterward, one of the biggest claims Republican used in their opposition to the law was arguing that the law effectively created “death panels” that would ration health care and not provide adequate care to elderly Americans.

PolitiFact labeled the claim their “lie of the year” in 2009, despite the fact that rationing of health care exists in countries with socialized, single-payer health care systems similar to those Democrats want to implement.

After the town hall, Rep. Bilirakis responded to the incident saying that he is holding town halls to hear the concerns of his constituents.

It’s my duty to hear you out, even if we may disagree. I want today’s town hall to be constructive and I want to find common ground. https://t.co/6p5xMwz7Oy

— Gus Bilirakis (@RepGusBilirakis) February 11, 2017

In 09 Dems passed ACA w/o listening to the people first. Held town halls after it became law. I want to do it differently & gather input now pic.twitter.com/6UnwwZa3M8

— Gus Bilirakis (@RepGusBilirakis) February 11, 2017

Democrats are becoming increasingly testy at town halls across the nation, similar to what the tea party did in 2009 and 2010. Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) faced brutal opposition and protests at a town hall earlier this week.

Posted in Florida, GOP, Town Hall, US

January 2nd, 2017 by Staff Writer

President Barack Obama has scheduled a meeting for next Wednesday with congressional Democrats to discuss saving The Affordable Care Act — or Obamacare — from President-elect Donald Trump and congressional Republicans who seek to repeal and replace it.

Obama’s signature healthcare legislation has been criticized almost since its passage in 2010 as not providing affordable health coverage and, in fact, driving up the cost of premiums. It has also been fraught with technical difficulties and scandals suggesting the designers knew it would never work but had to implement it to get to the single-payer healthcare option.

Trump has vowed to repeal the law and called it a “disaster.” He has also nominated vocal critic of the law Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) to head the Department of Health and Human Services. This has led congressional Democrats to worry that their GOP colleagues will make good on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s call to make repealing and replacing Obamacare “step one” in the GOP agenda this year.

Obama’s meeting comes just one day after Congress reconvenes, and the Democrats have already participated in a conference call to discuss protecting Obamacare and other entitlement programs, Fox News reports:

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, California, last week told fellow Democrats that they “stand ready to fight vigorously for America’s hard-working families” against such efforts, including  those by incoming Republican President Donald Trump, who has called ObamaCare a “disaster” and vowed, if elected, to repeal the 2010 law.

Pelosi also urged them to hold events to warn voters in their district about the GOP plans, including what she says is House Speaker Paul Ryan’s design to “privatize” Medicare, federally subsidized health insurance for seniors and the disabled.

GOP leaders have been open about the fact that a replacement plan for Obamacare could take two to four years to develop, and that repealing it right away could leave 22 million Americans without health insurance. 

Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders have also organized what they’re calling a “Day of Action” on Jan. 15, five days before Trump’s inauguration “to highlight GOP efforts to cut or significantly change ‘vital and necessary health programs,’” Fox News notes.

Posted in Barack Obama, Bernie Sanders, Chuck Schumer, Donald Trump, GOP, Nancy Pelosi, Obamacare, Politics

November 20th, 2016 by Staff Writer

The Washington Post recently broke down some of the polling numbers from the 2016 election cycle and came away with a very interesting fact concerning the election of Donald Trump: America waited until the last minute to vote for him over Hillary Clinton:

In Florida, 11 percent said they decided in the final week. In Pennsylvania, it was 15 percent. And in Michigan and Wisconsin — states where Trump made a late push — fully 20 percent of voters said they arrived at their choice in the last seven days.

The Post asserts that, once adjustments are made to account for these late deciders, the race between Trump and Clinton was closer than previously assumed, and the polls were more accurate than they first appeared:

In each and every one of those states, those swings, if accurate, would account for Trump’s victory. According to the most up-to-date results, Trump won Wisconsin by 0.9 points, Pennsylvania by 1.1 points and Florida by 1.2 points, and he’s leading in Michigan by 0.2 points…

…Without those four states, he loses to Clinton by almost the exact same margin, 307-231. Even if he just lost Florida and any of the other three states, he would have lost. If he won Florida but lost the other three, he would have lost. We’re only talking a shift of one percentage point or a little more. It was that close.

The question then becomes, if, as the Post suggests, “an electorate that truly appeared poised to elect Clinton decided to go for Trump at the 11th hour instead,” does Donald Trump have a mandate from the American people?

National Review says yes — depending on what he tries to accomplish given a true legislative mandate means his opposing party would feel compelled to help him:

House Republicans have a commanding majority, so if Trump tries to push policies most Republicans agree with, he will succeed in the House without needing to expend much political capital. Senate Republicans have 52 votes, plus Vice President Pence in the case of ties, so they too can win floor votes on anything that attracts Republican support, and on tax and budget bills subject to 51-vote reconciliation rules. But the real action in the Senate always revolves around the additional eight votes needed to get cloture on legislation and judges. For those votes, Trump may need to dip into the well of eleven Democratic Senators from states he carried in 2016, ten of whom are up for reelection in 2018.

So the question of whether Trump has a mandate may be answered the first time he meets resistance from, or is granted assistance by, the Democratic minority in Congress.

Posted in Donald Trump, GOP, Government, Poll, Senate Democrats

October 5th, 2016 by Staff Writer

The Republican Party’s website accidentally posted a review of Tuesday night’s vice presidential debate early, declaring Indiana Gov. Mike Pence the winner before his face-off with Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine even happened.

“The consensus was clear after the dust settled, Mike Pence was the clear winner of the debate,” the blog post, which has since been removed, read.

More than an hour before the #VPDebate, GOP declares Pence winner, replaces content w/ error message: pic.twitter.com/4JmSh13C84

— KATU News (@KATUNews) October 4, 2016

But before the link could be scrubbed from the GOP’s social media, readers who happened upon the errant post received some insight into Pence’s “top moments” during the debate. It described Republican nominee Donald Trump’s running mate as the “clear winner” against Kaine, his Democratic rival.

During the debate, the accidental post indicated, Pence bested Kaine by raising concerns over the state of the economy and attacking Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton for the numerous scandals plaguing her candidacy.

In addition to discussing his own record of accomplishments, the post said Pence was able to “perfectly” highlight what Trump hopes to accomplish, should he win the presidency.

“His running mate perfectly shared Trump’s vision to make America great again and that message is resonating with Americans all across the country,” the premature post read.

The vice presidential debate Tuesday evening marks the one and only time Kaine and Pence will face-off and comes a little more than one week after Trump and Clinton held their first debate.


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Leonardo DiCaprio: Climate change deniers ‘should not be allowed to hold public office’

Ronald Reagan’s son goes off on Trump: ‘I am glad my father is not alive to watch this’

Report: Trump demeaned women backstage on ‘The Apprentice’

Mark Cuban on Trump: ‘After military service, the most patriotic thing you can do as a wealthy person is pay your taxes’

White teen assaulted, bleeding from brain after possible Black Lives Matter argument: ‘I want to see them put in jail’

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, Mike Pence, Politics, Presidential Debates, Tim Kaine

June 24th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Senior Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald became the subject of some criticism Thursday afternoon after taking to Twitter to say Republicans are working to ensure “people like” Osama bin Laden can purchase firearms easily.

“Osama bin Laden was on the terrorist watch list,” the contributing editor tweeted. “GOP is fighting to make sure that people like him can buy guns without any inconvenience.”

Osama bin Laden was on the terrorist watch list. GOP is fighting to make sure that people like him can buy guns without any inconvenience.

— Kurt Eichenwald (@kurteichenwald) June 23, 2016

Eichenwald’s post comes after a 25-hour sit-in by Democrats who were pushing for a vote on gun control measures ended. The House Democrats were seeking to force House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) to hold a vote on a bipartisan amendment, proposed by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and backed by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), that would have barred anyone on the “no fly” or “selectee” lists from buying guns.

It took only minutes for one Twitter user, identified as “Smittie,” to point out that bin Laden was not a citizen and, therefore, “couldn’t buy [a gun] anyways.”

“Please tell me you’re not Ivy League educated,” he added.

At that, many more social media observers piled on Eichenwald for his comment.

.@kurteichenwald Journalists have been placed on the watch list for writing things the administration didn’t like. You want that?

— Bob Owens (@bob_owens) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald please don’t tweet anymore

— Stocks (@Bmac0507) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald There is so much stupid here, I don’t even know where to begin.

— ((((Mysterion)))) (@PornPops69) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald Osama Bin Laden was an American citizen with 5th amendment protected right of due process? I didnt know that. Wow @McRibz

— Keith Larson (@KPL2383) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald 3) He trained his guys to use box cutters & planes. This list is meaningless. Much like your tweet.

— (((Renegade Bagel))) (@TheBagel16) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald Oh the stupid hurts.

— David (@AngryDingo) June 23, 2016

@kurteichenwald Oh Kurt. He wasn’t a citizen , not entitled to Due Process rights like this one. This is beneath you.

— spongeworthy (@spongeworthy2) June 23, 2016


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

House Democrats Stage ‘Sit-In’ to Force a Vote on Gun Control Bill

Rep. Louie Gohmert Furiously Confronts Dems Staging Sit-In for Gun Control: ‘Radical Islam Killed These People!’

Councilwoman Advocates for ‘Keeping Guns Away From Dangerous People’ — but It’s Who She Says Is ‘Dangerous’ That Shocks Residents

GOP Senator Proposes Gun Control Compromise: ‘If We Can’t Pass This, It Truly Is a Broken System’

What Should Paul Ryan Do About House Democrats’ Gun Control ‘Sit-In’? — He Has a Few Options

Posted in Al Qaeda, GOP, Gun Control, Media, Newsweek, Orlando Shooting, Osama bin Laden, Paul Ryan, Politics, Radical Islam, Republicans, Terrorism, Twitter

June 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, a former contender for the Republican presidential nomination, attended a dinner with more than 20 leading conservatives to flesh out his comeback as a movement standard-bearer in the order of Ronald Reagan.

The dinner, reported by The Hill, was held at the Virginia home of conservative activist Brent Bozell, founder of the Media Research Center, and was intended to discuss the future of the senator’s political career.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Many at the dinner equated Cruz’s position in the Republican Party to that of Reagan, who lost his initial bid for the Republican nomination in 1976 but soared to the top in 1980. Similarly, many conservative figures see an encouraging opportunity for Cruz in 2020.

One of the specific purposes of the meeting was to determine how best to position Cruz for a future presidential campaign and how best to steer the conservative movement from his seat in the Senate chambers.

Dining with Cruz and his chief of staff Paul Teller were some of the senior-most leaders of the conservative movement.

After a long-suffering campaign, Cruz ceded the primary contest to now-presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. The Texas lawmaker has not yet endorsed the billionaire businessman, but has pledged to use his leverage at the GOP Convention in July to ensure “Judeo-Christian principles” remain on the party’s platform.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Liberal NY Daily News Writer Fires AR-15 for the First Time — Check Out His Reaction

Trump Supporters Order Dinner on Way Home From Candidate’s Rally — but Restaurant’s Treatment Leaves Them in a ‘State of Shock’

Trump Blasts Obama for Speech on Orlando Attack: He ‘Was More Angry at Me Than He Was at the Shooter’

Obama Explains Why He’s Still Not Using Term ‘Radical Islam,’ Calls for Gun Control in Speech on Orlando Terror Attack

Trump to Meet With NRA to Discuss This Specific Gun Control Proposal in Wake of Terror Attack

Posted in Campaign 2016, GOP, Politics, Republican Party, Ted Cruz

June 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, a former contender for the Republican presidential nomination, attended a dinner with more than 20 leading conservatives to flesh out his comeback as a movement standard-bearer in the order of Ronald Reagan.

The dinner, reported by The Hill, was held at the Virginia home of conservative activist Brent Bozell, founder of the Media Research Center, and was intended to discuss the future of the senator’s political career.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Many at the dinner equated Cruz’s position in the Republican Party to that of Reagan, who lost his initial bid for the Republican nomination in 1976 but soared to the top in 1980. Similarly, many conservative figures see an encouraging opportunity for Cruz in 2020.

One of the specific purposes of the meeting was to determine how best to position Cruz for a future presidential campaign and how best to steer the conservative movement from his seat in the Senate chambers.

Dining with Cruz and his chief of staff Paul Teller were some of the senior-most leaders of the conservative movement.

After a long-suffering campaign, Cruz ceded the primary contest to now-presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. The Texas lawmaker has not yet endorsed the billionaire businessman, but has pledged to use his leverage at the GOP Convention in July to ensure “Judeo-Christian principles” remain on the party’s platform.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Liberal NY Daily News Writer Fires AR-15 for the First Time — Check Out His Reaction

Trump Supporters Order Dinner on Way Home From Candidate’s Rally — but Restaurant’s Treatment Leaves Them in a ‘State of Shock’

Trump Blasts Obama for Speech on Orlando Attack: He ‘Was More Angry at Me Than He Was at the Shooter’

Obama Explains Why He’s Still Not Using Term ‘Radical Islam,’ Calls for Gun Control in Speech on Orlando Terror Attack

Trump to Meet With NRA to Discuss This Specific Gun Control Proposal in Wake of Terror Attack

Posted in Campaign 2016, GOP, Politics, Republican Party, Ted Cruz

June 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Donald Trump sent a bold message to Republican leadership during a rally Wednesday in Atlanta: shut up.

During the rally, the presumptive Republican nominee skewered the GOP for not being tough enough in negotiations — a common refrain for the businessman-turned-politician.

Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images

Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images

“You know the Republicans — honestly folks, our leaders, our leaders have to get tougher,” he said. “This is too tough to do it alone, but you know what I think I’m going to be forced to. I think I’m going to be forced to. Our leaders have to get a lot tougher.”

Following the criticism he’s received from within his own party for his attacks on the Mexican heritage of the judge who’s presiding over a Trump University lawsuit and his reaction to the Orlando terror attack, Trump asked GOP leaders to just stop talking.

“Be quiet,” he chided. “Just please be quiet. Don’t talk. Please be quiet. Just be quiet … because they have to get tougher, they have to get sharper, they have to get smarter. We have to have our Republicans either stick together or let me just do it by myself.”

Trump, who does not enjoy broad, unwavering support from many within the Republican Party leadership, has been rebuked for his positions and comments on several different issues recently.

Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims entering the U.S. has been rejected by House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.). And Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham, Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker also rebuked the candidate for his comments following the deadly Orlando attack.

“It wasn’t the kind of response that I would expect when 50 people have perished,” Corker said, according to NBC News. “You know, I think I’ve offered words of public encouragement in important times and continue to be discouraged by the results.”

“I continue to be discouraged by the direction of the campaign and the comments that are made,” he added. “And I did not think yesterday’s speech was the type of speech that one would give who wants to lead this country through difficult times.”

Alexander took his rejection of Trump a step further Tuesday, telling the Associated Press, “We don’t have a nominee.”

(H/T: Business Insider)


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Liberal NY Daily News Writer Fires AR-15 for the First Time — Check Out His Reaction

Trump Supporters Order Dinner on Way Home From Candidate’s Rally — but Restaurant’s Treatment Leaves Them in a ‘State of Shock’

Trump Blasts Obama for Speech on Orlando Attack: He ‘Was More Angry at Me Than He Was at the Shooter’

Obama Explains Why He’s Still Not Using Term ‘Radical Islam,’ Calls for Gun Control in Speech on Orlando Terror Attack

Trump to Meet With NRA to Discuss This Specific Gun Control Proposal in Wake of Terror Attack

Posted in Atlanta, Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Convention 2016, Paul Ryan, Politics, Republican Party

June 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Donald Trump sent a bold message to Republican leadership during a rally Wednesday in Atlanta: shut up.

During the rally, the presumptive Republican nominee skewered the GOP for not being tough enough in negotiations — a common refrain for the businessman-turned-politician.

Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images

Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images

“You know the Republicans — honestly folks, our leaders, our leaders have to get tougher,” he said. “This is too tough to do it alone, but you know what I think I’m going to be forced to. I think I’m going to be forced to. Our leaders have to get a lot tougher.”

Following the criticism he’s received from within his own party for his attacks on the Mexican heritage of the judge who’s presiding over a Trump University lawsuit and his reaction to the Orlando terror attack, Trump asked GOP leaders to just stop talking.

“Be quiet,” he chided. “Just please be quiet. Don’t talk. Please be quiet. Just be quiet … because they have to get tougher, they have to get sharper, they have to get smarter. We have to have our Republicans either stick together or let me just do it by myself.”

Trump, who does not enjoy broad, unwavering support from many within the Republican Party leadership, has been rebuked for his positions and comments on several different issues recently.

Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims entering the U.S. has been rejected by House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.). And Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham, Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker also rebuked the candidate for his comments following the deadly Orlando attack.

“It wasn’t the kind of response that I would expect when 50 people have perished,” Corker said, according to NBC News. “You know, I think I’ve offered words of public encouragement in important times and continue to be discouraged by the results.”

“I continue to be discouraged by the direction of the campaign and the comments that are made,” he added. “And I did not think yesterday’s speech was the type of speech that one would give who wants to lead this country through difficult times.”

Alexander took his rejection of Trump a step further Tuesday, telling the Associated Press, “We don’t have a nominee.”

(H/T: Business Insider)


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Liberal NY Daily News Writer Fires AR-15 for the First Time — Check Out His Reaction

Trump Supporters Order Dinner on Way Home From Candidate’s Rally — but Restaurant’s Treatment Leaves Them in a ‘State of Shock’

Trump Blasts Obama for Speech on Orlando Attack: He ‘Was More Angry at Me Than He Was at the Shooter’

Obama Explains Why He’s Still Not Using Term ‘Radical Islam,’ Calls for Gun Control in Speech on Orlando Terror Attack

Trump to Meet With NRA to Discuss This Specific Gun Control Proposal in Wake of Terror Attack

Posted in Atlanta, Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Convention 2016, Paul Ryan, Politics, Republican Party

June 14th, 2016 by Staff Writer

For months, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a vanquished candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, has vowed he will not seek re-election to the Senate. But Sunday’s terror attack in Orlando may have him re-thinking the decision to retire.

Speaking Monday with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, who urged the senator to run, Rubio made clear that he has not thought about the attack that left 49 dead and at least 53 injured “from a political perspective,” once again reiterating that a re-election campaign is “not part of our plan as a family.”

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

However, Rubio asserted that the deadly attack is another indication that the country is facing a “tipping point” with all the foreign policy challenges on the horizon.

“It really gives you pause to think a little bit about — you know — your service to your country and where you can be most useful to your country,” the former presidential hopeful told Hewitt.

Pressed by Hewitt about whether or not he would consider launching a Senate campaign, Rubio said: “My family and I will be praying about all this, and we’ll see what I need to do next with my life in regards to how I can best serve.”

But he does not have much time to think, if re-election to the Senate actually is one of his considerations, because the deadline to file his candidacy is June 24.

From the get-go, the Florida senator has remained committed to his decision to retire, noting the fact that his friend, Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, is currently campaigning for his Senate seat — a reality Rubio mentioned in his Monday discussion with Hewitt.

However, Rubio’s Republican colleagues have for weeks been urging him to re-enter the race, worried many current primary candidates will be unable to maintain their congressional seat for the GOP.

Florida Rep. David Jolly (R) is, according to Politico, considering dropping out of the race to replace Rubio in the Senate and instead return to his campaign for the House. If Rubio were to launch a re-election campaign, Jolly said he “would withdraw” and support Rubio.


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

49 Killed in Orlando Night Club Massacre, Making It Worst Mass Shooting in American History

Here’s What We Know About the Suspected Orlando Club Shooter Omar Mateen

Sanders Claims He Knows the Real Culprit Behind Orlando Shooting

Dem Rep. Makes a Big Claim About AR-15 Rifle — and Conservative Journalist Offers $50K If He Can Prove It

Anti-Gun Celebrities Respond to Orlando Shooting on Twitter

Posted in Florida, GOP, Marco Rubio, Orlando Shooting, Politics, Republican Party

May 6th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump set his sights on conservative critics who condemn his positions on trade during a rally in West Virginia Thursday.

US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally May 5, 2016 in Charleston, West Virginia. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally May 5, 2016 in Charleston, West Virginia. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

“I’m a conservative, but the conservatives hate me for suggesting I would dare tax somebody,” Trump said after promising he would punish companies that move overseas with high tariffs when they try to ship products back into the United States.

Trump — speaking to a crowd of mostly coalminers — spent most of his speech talking about jobs. At one point, the presumptive nominee put on a hard hat given to him by a miners’ union and mimicked a shoveling action.

Donald Trump just pantomimed shoveling coal pic.twitter.com/fu7BlE2gDC

— Brandon Wall (@Walldo) May 5, 2016

“Our jobs are going to everyone else but us,” he told the enthusiastic crowd. “We’re sending our jobs to Mexico, China is taking our jobs, Japan.”

Trump — pointing to a sign in the arena that read “Trump digs coal” — told the West Virginians he is “gonna open up the mines” if he’s elected president this fall.

“We’re gonna bring those miners back, you’re gonna be so proud of your president,” he said.

The billionaire businessman has been frequently criticized by conservative free trade advocates for vowing to punish companies with foreign-made products with a 35 percent tax. In defense of the policy, Trump says it will keep jobs inside the U.S. borders.

But his dissenters claim such a policy will increase the price tag for American consumers and could ultimately lead to a global trade war. Regardless, Trump stands by his proposal.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Is There a Conservative Third Party Movement Brewing? A Last-Ditch Effort to Stop Trump Could Have Huge Implications

Hannity Says It’s ‘Extremely Shallow’ for People to Blame Him for Rise of Trump

Tow Truck Driver Shows Up to Help Stranded Motorist When He Sees Sticker on Her Car That Makes Him Drive Away: ‘Call the Government’

Kasich to Drop Out of 2016 Race, Leaving Trump as Only Remaining GOP Candidate

Trump Says He Never Believed JFK-Rafael Cruz Conspiracy Theory, Only Wanted People to Read It

Posted in Campaign 2016, Conservatives, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Convention 2016, Politics, West Virginia

May 5th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus’ call to unify around presumptive nominee Donald Trump is off to a rocky start, based on the Twitter replies the GOP received Wednesday afternoon.

What began as an olive branch to supporters of failed Republican presidential candidates, thanking them for their “hard fought race,” quickly turned into a thread of Internet memes and comments mocking both the Republican Party and Trump.

Thank you to the entire Republican field for a hard fought race. The Party is better for your efforts.

— GOP (@GOP) May 4, 2016

At that, the comments began flowing, perhaps most notably from Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse (R) and Republican strategist Rick Wilson.

I assume this is a parody account? https://t.co/kPOoDpVmU7

— Ben Sasse (@BenSasse) May 4, 2016

Delete your account. https://t.co/cb1a0K1FHn

— Rick Wilson (@TheRickWilson) May 4, 2016

Then many others piled on.

.@GOP pic.twitter.com/WcdxLrLH8B

— Taylor Maycan (@TaylorMaycan) May 4, 2016

.@GOP pic.twitter.com/7EvVGPjRGC

— Jake Ciorciari (@jakekyle) May 4, 2016

.@GOP The party is better? pic.twitter.com/plBFl1TyA6

— Bate Felix Tabi Tabe (@BateFelix) May 4, 2016

@GOP BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHABAHABAHAHAHAHJSLGJISHYSYGAUWRBEVIXIURSBWIISHGHAJB *crying*

— O. Alan Noble (@TheAlanNoble) May 4, 2016

@GOP WTF are you smoking? The “party” is over. You allowed this abomination. You FAILED. 30 years I’ve been GOP, not anymore.

— Kristine ❀♡❀♡ (@KristineAz) May 4, 2016

Good luck with #KKK Donald. @GOP

— Brother Mark B (@ProgressWeekly) May 4, 2016

@GOP Is this a parody account? Should be.

— J Butler (@jbutler70) May 4, 2016

.@GOP pic.twitter.com/L8vhNQ0aOm

— Nick Ross (@NickBossRoss) May 4, 2016

.@GOP pic.twitter.com/1381cEhrAB

— Tweets by Collin™ (@TweetsByCollin) May 4, 2016

@GOP Are you kidding? You don’t actually think ANY of your candidates were “presidential material” do you?
Baaaahaaaaaaaa

— DSP (@GilaGal) May 4, 2016

@GOP Is this the individual running this account? pic.twitter.com/AV4V8aMd0Y

— JB (@JB_August) May 4, 2016

@GOP you were hacked, right?

— Fausto (@faustolozada) May 4, 2016

@GOP By “better” do you mean “near collapse” or “on death watch”?

— Robert Stribley (@stribs) May 4, 2016

Trump became the GOP’s presumptive nominee Tuesday night, after his chief rival Ted Cruz ended his presidential campaign. Ohio Gov. John Kasich also suspended his bid for the White House Wednesday evening, leaving Trump as the only remaining Republican candidate.

However, the Republican Party remains very split. Some Never-Trumpers are proposing a third party conservative alternative while others are calling on conservatives to vote for Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton in order to stop Trump from winning the presidency.


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Ted Cruz Ends Campaign for White House After Crushing Loss in Indiana

Trump is the Presumptive Nominee, So Where Do Never-Trumpers Go Now? We Spoke to Some Leading Voices

Here’s the Message RNC Chairman Reince Priebus Had for Republicans After Cruz Dropped Out of Race

Hoosier Daddy? Cruz Crushed in Indiana Primary

‘Presumptive Nominee’ Trump Thanks ‘Brave’ Cruz, Offers Glimpse Into General Election

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Convention 2016, Politics, Reince Priebus, Twitter

March 30th, 2016 by Staff Writer

“The Establishment” received some great publicity Tuesday afternoon.

No, not “Establishment” Washington, but the feminist magazine, “The Establishment.” However, one avid supporter of Republican front-runner Donald Trump didn’t seem to know that.

A woman identified as Joy Montiel on Twitter has spent a lot of time tweeting pro-Trump videos to GOP rival Ted Cruz, Democratic contender Hillary Clinton and the official GOP Twitter handle, and on Tuesday, she set her sights on “The Establishment.”

Montiel began her rant — which was unknowingly aimed at a team of feminist journalists — with a tweet saying, “F*** you!!!!” along with a video of comedian George Carlin explaining how politicians “own” the American people.

Image: Twitter @MontielJoy

Image: Twitter @MontielJoy

“The Establishment” staff was quick to respond to Montiel’s intense verbiage: “Wow, Joy, thanks. We’re so lucky you tweet your Trump support at us every day, it’s something special to look forward to.”

@MontielJoy Wow, Joy, thanks. We’re so lucky you tweet your Trump support at us every day, it’s something special to look forward to.

— The Establishment (@ESTBLSHMNT) March 29, 2016

But the Trump supporter still didn’t seem to look into who, exactly, @Estblshmnt was, continuing with her misdirected message.

“Screw you all, your [sic] all corrupt, you make me sick,” she tweeted. “Trumps people know what your doing as do we the people, ever heard of us?”

@ESTBLSHMNT screw you all, your all corrupt, you make me sick. Trumps people know what your doing as do we the people, ever heard of us?

— Joy Montiel (@MontielJoy) March 29, 2016

Finally, “The Establishment” told Montiel outright that they are “not the government,” and the Twitter foe asked for forgiveness.

@MontielJoy What? Do you know how twitter works? You’re yelling at a women’s magazine named The Establishment every day, not the government.

— The Establishment (@ESTBLSHMNT) March 29, 2016

@ESTBLSHMNT I’m really embarrassed, please forgive the inconvenience.

— Joy Montiel (@MontielJoy) March 29, 2016

Apparently, Montiel still continued to receive flack for her mistake, tweeting that “least I put what’s right and know how to apologize when I’m wrong,” which she said is “more than any liberal can or would do.”

Screw all of you, at least I put what’s right and know how to apologize when I’m wrong, more than any liberal can or would do. Screw you!!

— Joy Montiel (@MontielJoy) March 29, 2016

In this instance, Miley Cyrus’ once-famous lyrics really do ring true: “Everyone makes mistakes, everyone has those days.”

(H/T: New York Magazine)

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Radio Host Confronts Trump on Heidi Cruz Attack in Brutal Interview: ‘I Expect That From a 12-Year-Old Bully’

Shapiro Gets Into Tense Back-and-Forth With Pro-Choice Student, Demands She Explain When Life Begins

Trump Asks if He Can ‘Press Charges’ Against Ex-Breitbart Reporter Because She Allegedly Touched Him First

Fireworks Go Off When Radio Host Goes After Trump Spokeswoman Over Nat’l Enquirer Story: ‘Your Name Was in That Story’

Wisconsin Gov. Walker Endorses ‘Principled, Common-Sense Conservative’ Cruz For President

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Establishment, Hillary Clinton, Politics, Ted Cruz, Twitter

February 10th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus slammed Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton Tuesday night in an official statement from the GOP, saying her loss to Democratic rival Bernie Sanders “shows how off course” the former secretary of state’s “coronation” has gone.

Though Clinton did not expect to win in New Hampshire, Priebus suggested that, considering her razor-thin victory in Iowa, her showing in the Granite State Tuesday night is “embarrassing.”

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

“No amount of spin can make up for such a crushing defeat in a state that has for decades been in the Clintons’ corner,” Priebus said, referencing former President Bill Clinton’s 1992 “comeback” moment.

Priebus said it is the FBI investigation into Clinton’s “reckless conduct” as secretary of state that has hurt her campaign, adding that “even Democrats find her dishonesty and hypocrisy unacceptable.”

Ultimately, Priebus suggested Sanders’ success can be chalked-up to Democrats’ dissatisfaction with Clinton.

“The prospect that Democrats could nominate a self-avowed socialist is growing more probable by the day, and shows how off course Hillary Clinton’s coronation has gone.”

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

After Rally Attendee Hurls Nasty Insult at Cruz, Trump Warns Her Not to Say It Again — Then Repeats It

Did You Catch the Political Statement Embedded in Beyonce’s Super Bowl Halftime Performance?

Watch the ‘White Guilt’ Video Shown to High School Students That Has Some Parents in an Uproar

Dejected QB Cam Newton Has Little to Say to Media After Super Bowl Loss — Then He’s ‘Done’

Gay Man Confronts Marco Rubio in Tense Exchange: ‘Why Do You Want to Put Me Back in the Closet?’

Posted in Bernie Sanders, GOP, Hillary Clinton, New Hampshire Primary, Politics, Reince Priebus

January 6th, 2016 by Staff Writer

GOP presidential hopeful Rick Santorum had strong words for Iowa frontrunner Ted Cruz Tuesday, defending a controversial ad he released accusing the Texas senator of working for his own “personal aggrandizement.”

In his remarks, Santorum further criticized Cruz, grouping him with Trump as a “divisive figure” and suggesting he was someone with “literally no experience in national security.”

Santorum was responding to questions from TheBlaze about his ad entitled “fairytale” which contained clips of Cruz reading the children’s classic “Green Eggs and Ham” from the Senate floor during an hours-long speech against Obamacare.

That speech “is emblematic of someone who is out promoting himself as opposed actually accomplishing something for the conservative cause that is positive,” Santorum said.

Despite the fact that Cruz’s reading of the children’s book was during a filibuster in an effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Santorum said it was fair game for criticism because the filibuster strategy ultimately failed.

“He failed,” said Santorum, speaking of Cruz. “It was a failure. It was a poor strategy that failed.”

Santorum went on to so say that the Senate’s repeal of Obama’s hallmark law passed without the help of Cruz, but instead was pushed through as a team effort.

“He [Cruz] had nothing to do with it because it was a team effort,” continued Santorum. “We had someone going out and doing something that was for his own personal aggrandizement.”

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Watch How Ben Carson Handles Unexpected Question at Town Hall: ‘Do You Think I Chose to Be Gay?’

Sheriff Claims This Is the Hidden Objective of the Oregon ‘Militia’ Engaged in Standoff Over Prison Sentence for Local Ranchers

Here Are the Specific Executive Actions Obama Will Take to ‘Reduce Gun Violence’

Listen to the Reasons These Two Televangelists Give for Needing Their Own Private Jets: ‘We’ve Got to Have This!’

Washington Post Writer Calls Crowd Photo at Donald Trump Massachusetts Rally ‘Absolutely Mind-Boggling’

Posted in exclusive, GOP, GOP Primaries, Politics, Rick Santorum, Video

December 30th, 2015 by Staff Writer

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is battling with the Virginia Republican Party, because this cycle the state party organization wants to limit its primary to Republicans.

This wouldn’t be unusual for the many states that have closed primary contests, but Virginia has no party registration. Historically, Democratic affiliated voters or unaffiliated voters could vote in Republican primaries in the state — a rule they’re more likely to take advantage of in a year when the Democratic nomination seems locked up.

Republican-leaning voters could also vote in the Democratic primaries. Virginia’s presidential primary will be held on March 1, or Super Tuesday, along with 11 other states.

But last fall, Virginia Republicans decided to require voters in the GOP presidential primary to sight a “statement of affiliation,” saying: “My signature below indicates that I am a Republican.”

That requirement has gotten Trump’s attention.

Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign event at the Prince William County fairgrounds in Manassas, Virginia, U.S., on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015. Following a Monday meeting with approximately 100 African-American pastors and religious leaders, Trump emerged into the lobby of his signature Fifth Avenue property and declared it a success. (Pete Maravich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign event at the Prince William County fairgrounds in Manassas, Virginia,, on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015.  (Pete Maravich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

The statement would not be that different from a Texas law requiring voters to certify that they understand: “I am ineligible to vote or participate in another political party’s primary election or convention during this voting year.” Also, in Hawaii, the Republican primary is open but voters are required to fill out a GOP registration on that day.

Trump, in one of his many tweets on the topic, said the Virginia GOP was making a “suicidal mistake.” The real estate billionaire who’s leading in most national Republican polls hopes to rely on his appeal to Democrats and independents in Republican primaries to win the nomination.

Virginia is classified as a “hybrid primary” state by the National Conference of State Legislatures, meaning that it’s not entirely closed to registered party voters or open to all voters. The 24 “hybrid” states have varying rules about whether voters from one party can cross over to vote in another party’s primary, and varying rules on allowing unaffiliated voters to cast a ballot in a party’s primary, while in some states one party primary is open while the other is closed.

Virginia is among 21 states where both Republicans and Democrats can choose which party’s primary to vote in with varying degrees of restrictions set up by state parties. A dozen states are considered strictly closed primaries, where only a voter registered with a party can cast a ballot in that primary. Still various other states generally have what would be broadly viewed as close primaries, but allow independents to pick a primary to cast a ballot in.

The NCSL does a more thorough breakdown of how states run their primaries, even if most hybrids could broadly fit in the open or closed category.

Virginia’s move is not so unusual on the national stage.

“In some states, such as Alaska, political parties may decide for themselves whether to permit voters who are unaffiliated or are members of another party to participate in their primary,” according the NCSL. “The parties may not necessarily all choose the same approach in a given state. For instance, in 2008 and 2010, the Alaska Democratic party allowed any registered voter, regardless of party affiliation, to participate in its primary, while the Republican party limited participation in its primary to its own members.”

Among early nominating contests, Iowa and Nevada require party registrations, but New Hampshire and South Carolina do not.

Read more stories from TheBlaze

‘Sweet Cakes’ Owners’ Bank Accounts Seized as Damages for Refusing to Bake Wedding Cake for Lesbian Couple

Muslim Families Out to Eat on Christmas Eve Finished Their Meals and Asked for the Check. What They Saw on the Bill Returned to Their Table Is Going Viral.

‘I Emphatically Refuse’: Muslim ACLU Activist Explains Why She Won’t Condemn Islamic Terrorism

After 14-Minute Rant, Watch What Donald Trump Does With ‘Piece of Garbage’ New Hampshire Newspaper

Donald Trump Has Been Calling Bill Clinton’s Sex Scandals ‘Fair Game’ for the Campaign Trail. But in 2008, Trump Described Them Very Differently.

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Primaries, Politics, Republican Party, States, Virginia

December 29th, 2015 by Staff Writer

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) praised Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump in an interview this week, telling UtahPolicy.com that he likes a lot of what the billionaire has said during his campaign.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (right) discusses Donald Trump's candidacy with Bryan Schott (left). (Image source: YouTube screenshot)

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (right) discusses Donald Trump’s candidacy with Bryan Schott (left). (Image source: YouTube screenshot)

“I like a lot of what he’s saying,” Chaffetz told UtahPolicy.com managing editor Bryan Schott. But the congressman tempered his compliments by distancing himself from Trump’s comments regarding a “religious litmus test on entering the country,” referring to the businessman’s proposed ban on all Muslim immigrants.

“I happen to think that’s way over the top, uncalled for, I totally disagree with that,” Chaffetz said. “But, there are a lot of things that he says that I actually really do like, that I think other people should be talking about and how he does it is his own style. There’s only one Donald — that’s for sure.”

Chaffetz, who chairs the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, voiced opposition earlier this month to Trump’s plan to ban Muslims from entering the U.S. by visiting an Islamic mosque in Utah, calling the front-runner’s proposal “intolerance that should not stand.”

Those comments aside, Trump’s campaign seemed to be resonating with Chaffetz.

“If he wins, he wins,” Chaffetz told Schott earlier in the interview. “I think people are attracted to him for a variety of reasons — they want results, they want somebody who’s going to blow through the red tape, who actually will get things done in Washington, D.C. And to that extent, more power to him.”

Chaffetz warned, though, that there is a “sobering moment” coming in January, saying he is unsure if voters will actually vote for Trump when they start going to the polls in the early states. Chaffetz told Schott that former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) was leading in the polls at this time in 2011, but that it was Gov. Mitt Romney (R-Mass.) who ended up with the GOP nomination.

“There’s a sobering moment when we turn in to the new year and people start to think about whether or not they’ll actually check that box, and you know, it starts in Iowa before we know it, and then off to New Hampshire and it’s a whole different game after that,” Chaffetz said.

Watch the interview below:

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Muslim Families Out to Eat on Christmas Eve Finished Their Meals and Asked for the Check. What They Saw on the Bill Returned to Their Table Is Going Viral.

Ted Cruz Requests ‘Thoughts & Prayers’ for Those Affected by Texas Storms. But Some Folks Take Exception to That.

Hillary Clinton’s Campaign Move That Has Donald Trump Crying ‘So Inappropriate!’

‘SNL’ Alum’s Pointed Criticism of Barack and Michelle Obama Probably Won’t Sit Too Well With Liberal Hollywood

‘We Need Relief in Chicago’: Families of Two Killed by Chicago Police Speak Out

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Primaries, Jason Chaffetz, muslims, Politics, Utah, Video, watch

December 21st, 2015 by Staff Writer

Former Alaska Gov. and Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin likened the GOP-run Congress to “our abuser” and those who voted for them to a “battered wife” in a column for Breitbart published Saturday.

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

“They did it again,” Palin wrote, referring to the just-signed $1.1 trillion Omnibus spending bill. “But like a battered wife, we keep going back because every four years they bring us flowers, beg our forgiveness, and swear they’ll never hit us again.”

“The GOP establishment in Congress is our abuser. We can’t hide the black eyes any more. The whole neighborhood knows,” Palin continued. “The Democrats are gloating. Obama thanked Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) effusively – and why shouldn’t he? Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) couldn’t have given him more.”

More from Palin:

And where was the famed House Freedom Caucus – those stalwart conservatives who spearheaded Boehner’s ouster? They were shrugging and handing us a bag of frozen peas to put on our black eye. If we’re lucky, maybe they’ll call 911 for us when the beating starts up again.

This is shameful, and it has to end. No mas!

For the last seven years, grassroots conservatives rallied to action under the belief that change starts at the ballot box. As I’ve said many times: there is nothing wrong with this country that a good old-fashioned election can’t fix.

People put their own lives on hold to send these Republicans to Congress to take back control of the House and Senate, to get a handle on our bankrupt federal government, and put America on the right track. I think of all the cross-country redeye flights I took away from my young son in order to campaign for Republican candidates, so full of promises, over the years. Others gave up a lot more than I did to elect a “conservative” majority.

Together, we grassroots conservatives gave the GOP historic electoral victories because they promised us they would stop Obama’s “fundamental transformation of America.”

Instead, they abetted it. They are Obama’s accomplices.

Palin went on to say that with Omnibus bill, the Republican Congress “broke every promise they made to us. Every single one. They’ve reached a level of brazen duplicity previously known only to Democrats.”

“This is why people hate politics and politicians,” she later wrote. “This is why they tune out and stay home. Reading through chunks of this bloated spending bill that drives us further into bankruptcy I steamed, ‘That’s it. They can’t be trusted. I’m outta here because they do not stand on the planks of the GOP platform, not one iota.’”

Palin then claimed that the “GOP establishment” actually wants conservative voters to “leave the Party or just sit out elections” to make their political lives easier — and that the elected body “doesn’t care about winning national elections. As far as they’re concerned, Hillary can have the White House – just so long as they can keep their cushy jobs on Capitol Hill.”

The former governor added that a Democratic president gives the GOP an easy excuse to not lead while keeping “all the crony capital cash” as well as “the perks of office” while the “country continues to crash and burn.”

Palin’s conclusion:

Thankfully, not everyone with an “R” after their name is happy with the corrupt status quo. And there are a lot more good guys in Congress now thanks to the Tea Party.

So, no, it’s not time to leave the GOP. We’re going to make our abusers leave.

We’re not going to let them hit us again.

It’s time to kick our abusers out of the House, change the locks, and keep a loaded shotgun next to the bed.

(H/T: The Huffington Post)

Read more stories from TheBlaze

How Clinton Responds When Asked if Americans Who Want More Guns After California Attack Are ‘Wrong’

Guess Who Just Said, ‘I’ve Gotta Get This Off My Chest: Donald Trump Is a Jerk’

Clinton Makes Questionable Claim: Islamic State ‘Showing Videos of Donald Trump’ to Recruit Fighters

Glenn Beck Reveals Condition ABC Broke With ’20/20′ Special – and the Part That ‘Horrified’ Him

Here’s the Republican Presidential Ticket Former DNC Head Says Would Scare Democrats the Most

Posted in Congress, GOP, Politics, Republicans, Sarah Palin

December 21st, 2015 by Staff Writer

Former Alaska Gov. and Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin likened the GOP-run Congress to “our abuser” and those who voted for them to a “battered wife” in a column for Breitbart published Saturday.

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

“They did it again,” Palin wrote, referring to the just-signed $1.1 trillion Omnibus spending bill. “But like a battered wife, we keep going back because every four years they bring us flowers, beg our forgiveness, and swear they’ll never hit us again.”

“The GOP establishment in Congress is our abuser. We can’t hide the black eyes any more. The whole neighborhood knows,” Palin continued. “The Democrats are gloating. Obama thanked Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) effusively – and why shouldn’t he? Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) couldn’t have given him more.”

More from Palin:

And where was the famed House Freedom Caucus – those stalwart conservatives who spearheaded Boehner’s ouster? They were shrugging and handing us a bag of frozen peas to put on our black eye. If we’re lucky, maybe they’ll call 911 for us when the beating starts up again.

This is shameful, and it has to end. No mas!

For the last seven years, grassroots conservatives rallied to action under the belief that change starts at the ballot box. As I’ve said many times: there is nothing wrong with this country that a good old-fashioned election can’t fix.

People put their own lives on hold to send these Republicans to Congress to take back control of the House and Senate, to get a handle on our bankrupt federal government, and put America on the right track. I think of all the cross-country redeye flights I took away from my young son in order to campaign for Republican candidates, so full of promises, over the years. Others gave up a lot more than I did to elect a “conservative” majority.

Together, we grassroots conservatives gave the GOP historic electoral victories because they promised us they would stop Obama’s “fundamental transformation of America.”

Instead, they abetted it. They are Obama’s accomplices.

Palin went on to say that with Omnibus bill, the Republican Congress “broke every promise they made to us. Every single one. They’ve reached a level of brazen duplicity previously known only to Democrats.”

“This is why people hate politics and politicians,” she later wrote. “This is why they tune out and stay home. Reading through chunks of this bloated spending bill that drives us further into bankruptcy I steamed, ‘That’s it. They can’t be trusted. I’m outta here because they do not stand on the planks of the GOP platform, not one iota.’”

Palin then claimed that the “GOP establishment” actually wants conservative voters to “leave the Party or just sit out elections” to make their political lives easier — and that the elected body “doesn’t care about winning national elections. As far as they’re concerned, Hillary can have the White House – just so long as they can keep their cushy jobs on Capitol Hill.”

The former governor added that a Democratic president gives the GOP an easy excuse to not lead while keeping “all the crony capital cash” as well as “the perks of office” while the “country continues to crash and burn.”

Palin’s conclusion:

Thankfully, not everyone with an “R” after their name is happy with the corrupt status quo. And there are a lot more good guys in Congress now thanks to the Tea Party.

So, no, it’s not time to leave the GOP. We’re going to make our abusers leave.

We’re not going to let them hit us again.

It’s time to kick our abusers out of the House, change the locks, and keep a loaded shotgun next to the bed.

(H/T: The Huffington Post)

Read more stories from TheBlaze

How Clinton Responds When Asked if Americans Who Want More Guns After California Attack Are ‘Wrong’

Guess Who Just Said, ‘I’ve Gotta Get This Off My Chest: Donald Trump Is a Jerk’

Clinton Makes Questionable Claim: Islamic State ‘Showing Videos of Donald Trump’ to Recruit Fighters

Glenn Beck Reveals Condition ABC Broke With ’20/20′ Special – and the Part That ‘Horrified’ Him

Here’s the Republican Presidential Ticket Former DNC Head Says Would Scare Democrats the Most

Posted in Congress, GOP, Politics, Republicans, Sarah Palin

December 10th, 2015 by Staff Writer

In an appearance on The Glenn Beck Program Wednesday evening, author and BuzzFeed reporter McKay Coppins uncovered what he described as the “mantra” House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) lived by when he was Gov. Mitt Romney’s running mate during the 2012 presidential campaign — and it has to do with Sarah Palin.

When Paul Ryan “signs on to the Romney campaign, he’s a very earnest, you know, dutiful guy, and he says right from the beginning that he’s going to avoid, kind of, the ‘going rogue’ that Sarah Palin did when she was the 2008 running mate,” Coppins told Stu Burguiere, who was sitting in for Glenn Beck.

Coppins went on to say that Ryan was determined to model his vice presidential campaign in “opposition” to the former Alaska governor’s ’08 approach, when she campaigned alongside Arizona Sen. John McCain.

His mantra, according to people close to him, was ‘WWPD’ — ‘What Wouldn’t Palin Do?’ Coppins divulged: “That, kind of, was his governing philosophy in terms of how to help Mitt Romney.”

For the most part, Coppins told Burguiere, Ryan did “everything the campaign asks,” adding that the now-House Speaker said he “really admires” Romney “on a personal level.”

Complimentary Clip From TheBlaze TV

The full episode of The Glenn Beck Program, along with many other live-streaming shows and thousands of hours of on-demand content, is available on just about any digital device. Click here to watch every Glenn Beck episode from the past 30 days for just $1!

Follow Tré Goins-Phillips (@tregp) on Twitter

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Filmmakers Disguise a Bible as a Koran and Head Out on the Street. What They Do Next Has Some So Shocked That They Spout Expletives.

‘We Will Go to Break If You Keep Talking’: Donald Trump’s On-Air Fight With MSNBC Host Forces Abrupt Commercial Break

Trump Spokeswoman Stuns With Four-Word Rebuttal to S.E. Cupp on Proposal to Ban Muslims

Liberal Guest Makes Anti-Gun Case by Admitting She Has ‘No Idea How to Shoot Anybody’ — Watch Michelle Malkin’s Response

‘Happy Holidays!’: Atheists Unveil Santa-Themed Christmas Billboard — and Here’s Why Some Say It’s ‘Offensive’

Posted in Campaign 2012, GOP, Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan, Sarah Palin, Stu Burguiere, TheBlaze TV, Video, watch

December 1st, 2015 by Staff Writer

Glenn Beck hinted Monday morning that his work in media might not be the pinnacle of his career. In fact, the radio host casually floated the idea of a potential run for the presidency.

“I’ve told you guys this, I don’t think I’ve said this on the air,” Beck said on The Glenn Beck Radio Program. “In eight to 12 years, I’m thinking about running for president of the United States.”

Though it wasn’t clear whether he was speaking seriously or sarcastically, Beck shared his potential political aspirations after he and co-host Pat Gray discussed their plan to defeat the Islamic State.

“Marcus [Luttrell] gathers about 300 of his closest, most personal SEAL friends. You untie their hands. You remove all the rules of engagement,” Gray said of his plan to defeat radical Islam. “You say, ‘We’re not going to pay a bit of attention to what you do. You just go.’ And they kill every single member of ISIS. You give them six months, and they kill every member.”

Beck agreed, adding that he would do just that, if he ever were to actually become president.

“Honestly this weekend I was thinking, ‘If I was president, what would I do?’ And that was part of it,” Beck said. “But the other part is, we have to find a way to short-circuit [the Islamic State’s] prophecy. And this is why when anybody says, ‘This has nothing to do with Islam,’ you have to impress on them, it has everything to do with Islam.”

Whether his comments were genuine or in jest, Beck was adamant that the U.S. would not be able to defeat the Islamic State as long as the government keeps “denying this has anything to do with Islam.”

Complimentary Clip From TheBlaze TV

The full episode of The Glenn Beck Program, along with many other live-streaming shows and thousands of hours of on-demand content, is available on just about any digital device. Click here to watch every Glenn Beck episode from the past 30 days for just $1!

Follow Tré Goins-Phillips (@tregp) on Twitter

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Muslim Missionaries Converting Christians in Africa Teach Chant: Jesus Is the ‘Slave of Allah’ and Muhammad

Liberal Actress Bette Midler Has a Pretty Good Idea Who’s to Blame for Planned Parenthood Shooting

Donald Trump Cancels Press Conference With Black Evangelical Leaders That He Thought Would Include Endorsement

When a Woman Saw a U.S. Marine Standing in the Cold Outside Walmart, She Demanded Answers — and She Didn’t Like the Explanation

Movie Studio, Director Apologize for Mostly White Cast in Upcoming Film

Posted in Campaign 2016, DNC, Glenn Beck, GOP, TheBlaze TV, Video

November 24th, 2015 by Staff Writer

Donald Trump Takes A Shot at the RNC

Donald Trump Takes a Shot at the RNC

In a tweet on Monday, Donald Trump takes a shot at the RNC. Trump said that the Republican National Committee is violating the loyalty pledge the two parties signed in September. According to Trump:

“WSJ reports that GOP getting ready to treat me unfairly– big spending planned against me. That wasn’t the deal!”

 

In the initial agreement with the RNC, Trump said that he was pledging his “total allegiance” to the Republican Party. By signing, Trump was required to support the eventual party nominee and promise to not launch a third party run.

 

However, now that Trump believes that he is going to be treated unfairly, there is the possibility that he will split ties and run as an independent candidate. Should this happen, the Republican voter block will be split and could ensure that the Democratic nominee will be elected for the White House in 2016.

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Primaries, John Kasich, Politics, Republican Party

November 24th, 2015 by Staff Writer

Business magnate and GOP presidential aspirant Donald Trump suggested over Twitter Monday that the Republican National Committee is violating the loyalty pledge the two parties signed in September.

“WSJ reports that GOP getting ready to treat me unfairly — big spending planned against me,” Trump tweeted, tagging the RNC. “That wasn’t the deal!”

.@WSJ reports that @GOP getting ready to treat me unfairly—big spending planned against me. That wasn’t the deal!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 23, 2015

Trump’s comments seem to have arisen from a recent Wall Street Journal piece outlining Republican operative Liz Mair’s planned “guerrilla campaign” to “defeat and destroy” the celebrity’s candidacy. It is important to note, however, Mair is not an official RNC staffer, but she is the party’s former online communications director.

This comes the same day the Super PAC behind GOP rival Gov. John Kasich (Ohio) initiated an attack against Trump, airing its first 47-second ad highlighting some of the businessman’s less-than-flattering campaign moments.

According to the WSJ story, this is all part of a strategy to “unite donors from rival camps” against Trump, a marked difference from previous months when the candidates avoided taking direct shots at Republican front-runner.

“The stark reality is that unless something dramatic and unconventional is done, Trump will be the Republican nominee and Hillary Clinton will become president,” a memo released by Mair’s “Trump Card” reads.

When Trump signed the original agreement with the GOP, he insisted he was pledging his “total allegiance” to the Republican Party. The deal required that Trump support the eventual party nominee and promise to not launch a third party run.

However, Trump’s frustrations signal the possibility he might renege on the pledge’s stipulations. Should he run as an Independent candidate, Trump would likely severely split the Republican voter block, nearly ensuring the Democratic nominee wins the White House in 2016.

(H/T: Mediaite)

Follow Tré Goins-Phillips (@tregp) on Twitter

 

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Trump Says When Twin Towers Fell on 9/11, He Saw ‘Thousands and Thousands’ Celebrating in Jersey City. But the Mayor Says Something Else.

Ahmed ‘Clock Kid’ Mohamed’s Family Demands $15 Million From City of Irving, School District — and That’s Not All

After Ohio Bakery’s ‘Politically Incorrect’ Front-Door Sign Goes Viral, Staffers Describe How Customers Have Reacted

Donald Trump on Protester Who Interrupted His Rally: ‘Maybe He Should Have Been Roughed Up’

Famous American Author Asks If It’s ‘Naive’ to Wonder If Islamic State Has ‘Celebratory & Joyous’ Qualities. The Responses Are Not to Be Missed.

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, GOP, GOP Primaries, John Kasich, Politics, Republican Party

November 7th, 2015 by Staff Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pennsylvania Republican Rep. Joe Pitts announced Friday he will not seek re-election and will retire at the end of his 10th term.

Pitts, 76, is one of the House’s most ardent conservatives on social issues such as abortion.

Despite my deep appreciation for those urging me to run, I have decided not to run for re-election in 2016.
https://t.co/qRlp5ahsZY

— CongressmanJoePitts (@RepJoePitts) November 6, 2015

As chairman of a key health panel on the powerful Energy and Commerce Committee, Pitts helped pass legislation earlier this year to fix a broken Medicare reimbursement system for physicians and is a co-author of bipartisan legislation boosting medical research.

Rep. Joe Pitts (Image source: Twitter/@CongressmanJoePitts)

Rep. Joe Pitts (Image source: Twitter/@CongressmanJoePitts)

“I plan to focus my future work on human rights and religious freedom, both domestic and international, as well as on matters of culture and the American family,” Pitts said in a statement announcing his retirement.

The grandfatherly Pitts represents a solidly Republican district that includes Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Before being elected to Congress in 1996, he flew B-52 missions during the Vietnam War, owned a nursery business and served in the Pennsylvania state house.

“Joe Pitts has done it all – a veteran Air Force pilot in Vietnam, accomplished artist, taught high school math, even built his home in Kennett Square with his bare hands – and in between he’s found time for four decades of distinguished public service in the marble hallways of Harrisburg and Washington,” said Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich.

Read more stories from TheBlaze

‘I’m Completely Speechless’: Watch as ‘Morning Joe’ Panel Is Momentarily Stunned Silent by Ben Carson’s Egyptian Pyramid Theory

Suspect in UC Merced Stabbings Identified as 18-Year-Old Faisal Mohammad — Here’s What We Know

Politico: Ben Carson Campaign Admitted to a Fabrication in His Book. Team Carson Responds: Report Is an ‘Outright Lie’

After Officer Is Found Not Guilty in Fatal Shooting of Unarmed Man Laying Face-Down in Snow, DA’s Office Released the Graphic Video

Two-Page Handwritten Manifesto Found on Body of UC Merced Attacker — Here’s What It Said, and Who He Praised

Posted in Congress, GOP, House of Representatives, Politics, US

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons