Category: George W. Bush

July 15th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Former presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton had a warm and engaging speaking event Thursday in Dallas, Texas, at a program for the Presidential Leadership Scholars. Clinton’s answer to one question sounded suspiciously to commentators on Fox News like a critique of a recent presidential candidate.

Moderator David Rubenstein asked what the most important quality someone would need who is aspiring to be a president. After Bush’s very brief but insightful answer, Clinton responded.

“I also think you have to begin with the end in mind,” Clinton said. “You have to say, yeah, you gotta win the election. But why in the heck are you running?”

“That’s another thing I noticed about him,” Clinton said, pointing at Bush. “When he ran for governor against Ann Richards, he didn’t say ‘Ann Richards is a klutz.’ He said, ‘I wanna be governor because I wanna do one, two, three things.’ Couple of ’em I didn’t agree with. But he had an agenda.”

“If you want to be president,” he continued, “realize, it’s about the people, not about you.”

Howard Kurtz on Fox News said the former president gave himself enough space to deny the similarities to criticisms of the Hillary Clinton 2016 campaign, but explained why some thought it was a jab at her lack of political skill.

“It’s obvious to the rest of us what he’s talking about,” Kurtz said, “and look, Hillary Clinton had a campaign where she had a whole laundry list of liberal positions but no theme, no emotional connection to voters, and not much more beyond Donald Trump is awful, and that’s what the former president was artfully saying.”

Kurtz continued, explaining that Hillary Clinton failed “to campaign with certain kinds of voters where she didn’t go as well, Martha.”

“So Clinton, the former president, that is,” he added, “argued internally during the 2016 campaign, his wife needed to do more of that. He did some of it himself, he went to places like Lansing, Michigan, the final week of the campaign.”

The quote from the former president continued after the Fox News video, and many saw instead a pointed critique of President Donald Trump.

“And when it’s over,” Clinton said, “and that’s what a lot of these people who are real arrogant in office, they forget, and it passes more quickly than you know. You wanna be able to say people are better off when I quit, kids have a better future, things were coming together, you don’t wanna say, ‘God, look at all the people I beat!’”

Even during the 2016 presidential campaign many supporters of Hillary Clinton would compare her to her husband, saying that she just didn’t have the political skill he had to engage every individual voter. There were reports that her campaign was trying to keep the former president from upstaging her at events.

On Monday former President Bill Clinton sat down with 'CBS This Morning' co-host Charlie Rose to discuss his wife Hillary Clinton's recent struggles in the Presidential race. While Bill made it a point to say Hillary's physical health is on the rise after her public collapsing at a 9/11 memorial, he did emphasize the struggle she has to connect with voters.

Posted in 2016 presidential election, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Hillary Clinton, Politics

January 20th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Former President George W. Bush updated America Thursday on the conditions of his parents George H.W. Bush and Barbara Bush who had been hospitalized this week earlier this week.

He posted an encouraging message on his official Instagram account:

Your prayers are working: 41 and Mom are doing much better today and fighting on. Thanks for your messages of love and support for Mother and Dad. @Laurawbush and I look forward to representing them at the Inauguration tomorrow while they continue to recover in Houston.

A photo posted by George W. Bush (@georgewbush) on

The message reads, “Your prayers are working: 41 and Mom are doing much better today and fighting on. Thanks for your messages of love and support for Mother and Dad. @Laurawbush and I look forward to representing them at the Inauguration tomorrow while they continue to recover in Houston.”

Former President H.W. Bush had been hospitalized on Saturday for shortness of breath but was then diagnosed with pneumonia and put in ICU care with sedation. His wife, 91-year-old Barbara Bush was hospitalized as a precaution when she experienced fatigue and coughing.

The elder Bush had already planned on missing President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration, saying that his doctor told him it would be very dangerous to make the trip in his health. He added, “I want you to know that I wish you the very best as you begin this incredible journey of leading our great country,” in the apologizing letter to Trump.

Posted in Bush family, Donald Trump, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Office of the President, Politics, Texas

January 17th, 2017 by Staff Writer

Trish Regan of Fox News Business caught Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) in what appears to be an exaggeration about how extraordinary it is for him to skip a president’s inauguration.

Regan aired video of Lewis saying that this is the first inauguration he’s skipping since he’s been in office, but then quoted from the Washington Post in 2001 detailing his whereabouts during George W. Bush’s first inauguration.

After skipping Bush’s inauguration in ’01, there’s a pattern of John Lewis’s attempts to de-legitimize Presidents! pic.twitter.com/tmEk1kaLpU

— VP Elect (@MikePenceVP) January 16, 2017

Not only did the Washington Post report that he skipped Bush’s inaugural, but he questioned his legitimacy as well:

John Lewis, for instance, spent [inauguration] day in his Atlanta district. He thought it would be hypocritical to attend Bush’s swearing-in because he doesn’t believe Bush is the true elected president.

Lewis opened the floodgates of Democrat representatives skipping President-elect Donald Trump’s inaugural when he said that he felt his presidency was illegitimate. More than 30 other members of Congress have declared that they are sitting out the inaugural ceremony on January 20th.

Trump assailed Lewis from his Twitter account in response, pointing to apparent short-comings in the representative’s congressional district. Many have disputed Trump’s characterization of the district, and some accused the description of being animated by racism.

Posted in Congress, Donald Trump, George W. Bush, Inauguration, John Lewis, Politics, Trump

October 18th, 2016 by Staff Writer

As recent Nobel Prize winner Bob Dylan once wrote, “times, they are a-changin’.”

According to a new study by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, there is a wide schism between millennials and older Americans when it comes perspectives on communism, socialism and the number of deaths that occurred under President George W. Bush’s administration.

President George W. Bush speaks at the opening ceremony of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on Sept. 24, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

President George W. Bush speaks at the opening ceremony of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on Sept. 24, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

In the minds of 80 percent of baby boomers and 91 percent of elderly Americans, communism was a major problem in years past and remains a significant concern today. But millennials, aged 16 to 20 years, see it differently. Only 55 percent of the younger generation take issue with communism, 45 percent say they would vote for a socialist and 21 percent say they’d vote for a communist.

And millennials made all that clear during the Democratic presidential primary, when many of them cast their vote for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a self-avowed socialist. In fact, the report credits the New England lawmaker with a “bounce” that led to less than half of millennials — 42 percent — having a favorable view of capitalism.

By contrast, 64 percent of Americans aged 65 and older hold a favorable view of the capitalist structure.

In addition to the dramatic turn in political ideology, the study revealed an alarming lack of historical knowledge among millennials — a realization that might be impacting their political leanings.

According to the report, 32 percent — one-third — of millennials believe more people were killed under Bush’s presidency than Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. The study also finds that a majority of respondents “grossly underestimated” the number of deaths associated with communism.

A mere 25 percent correctly identified that communism led to the deaths of “over 100 million people.”

“It is because of such widespread ignorance about communism that we formed the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, which is dedicated to telling the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth,” Lee Edwards, co-founder of the Foundation, told the Daily Signal of the study.

Edwards went on to say it is the current generation’s “solemn obligation” to teach future generations about the history of communism, which he described as “the deadliest ism of the last 100 years.”

See the full study below:

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Franklin Graham sounds off on the Evangelical response to Trump’s latest scandals

Poll: Voters overwhelmingly believe Donald Trump’s accusers

New poll shows deteriorating situation for Trump in Utah

Poll: Almost half of Trump supporters see Russia as a friend to the U.S.

Donald Trump lashes out at ‘Saturday Night Live,’ calls for an end to the historic show

Posted in Bernie Sanders, Campaign 2016, George W. Bush, Millennials, Politics

August 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said Monday there were no “successful” attacks carried out by radical Islamic terrorists in the eight years before President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton assumed office.

“Under those eight years, before Obama came along, we didn’t have any successful radical Islamic terrorist attack in the United States,” Giuliani said ahead of a speech on foreign policy from Donald Trump, the Republican nominee for president. “They all started when Clinton and Obama got into office.”

Photo by Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Photo by Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Some were confused by the claim, given Giuliani was, of course, the mayor of New York City at the time of the Sept. 11 attack in 2001. In fact, in the wake of the assault, Giuliani emerged as “America’s mayor.” He was called out on Twitter for the technicality.

This guy was the mayor of New York City on September 11, 2001. https://t.co/oPzrWPlAGl

— Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith) August 15, 2016

Obviously Giuliani knows that 9/11 happened. The framing around Trump sounds weirdly—even when it’s unintentional—like life started in 2008.

— Katherine Miller (@katherinemiller) August 15, 2016

Giuliani’s comments were intended to offer praise to Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, Trump’s vice presidential running mate, for his work in Congress after 9/11.

“He’s a member of the Foreign Affairs and Judiciary committees, and during the time of Sept. 11, when we went through the worst foreign attack in our history, since the War of 1812,” the former mayor said.

He continued, “Remember, we didn’t start this war. They did. We don’t want this war. They do. And they didn’t start it even in 2001. They attacked the World Trade Center in 1993 and they attacked it under the ideology of radical Islamic extremism to create a caliphate.”

In Giuliani’s view, Pence “understands” the threat the U.S. faces from terrorists.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, a one-time contender for the Republican presidential nomination, was criticized by Trump for making a similar comment on the campaign trail. Bush suggested his brother, former President George W. Bush, “kept us safe” when he was in the White House.

“The World Trade Center came down during your brother’s reign — remember that,” Trump charged during a February debate, after his former opponent repeated the line.

See Giuliani’s comments below:

Video of Rudy saying we didn’t “have any successful radical Islamic terrorist attacks in the U.S.” before Obama: pic.twitter.com/3tC1InfZj0

— andrew kaczynski (@BuzzFeedAndrew) August 15, 2016


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Milwaukee Officials Plead for Calm as Violence Wracks City After Man Fatally Shot by Police

Amid Milwaukee Violence, Black Man Complains About ‘Rich People’ and What They’re Not Doing With Their Money

Watch How Clinton Supporters Answer When Asked if It’s Time to ‘Repeal the Second Amendment’

Sister of Milwaukee Man Fatally Shot by Cops Caught on Video Urging Rioters to Burn Down the Suburbs

Milwaukee Officer Who Fatally Shot Armed Black Man Also Black, Police Chief Says

Posted in 9/11, Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, George W. Bush, Jeb Bush, Politics, Radical Islam, Rudy Giuliani, Terrorism, Video, watch

August 9th, 2016 by Staff Writer

While “low energy” Jeb Bush many not be on Donald Trump’s side, his son, George P. Bush, is pledging to support the Republican presidential nominee in November.

“From Team Bush, it’s a bitter pill to swallow, but you know what? You get back up and you help the man that won, and you make sure that we stop Hillary Clinton,” George P. Bush, the Texas land commissioner, told GOP activists Saturday.

Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

But other members of his family, including his dad and former presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush, aren’t buying into the new Republican Party Trump is constructing. In George W. Bush’s view, the billionaire’s policies encourage “isolationism, nativism, and protectionism.”

Jeb Bush has pledged he will not support Trump in November: “I will not vote for Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton,” the former Florida governor wrote in May, “but I will support principled conservatives at the state and federal levels, just as I have done my entire life.”

And during a February interview on CBS, Barbara Bush, George P. Bush’s grandmother, said she doesn’t know “how women can vote for someone who said what he said about Megyn Kelly,” referring to Trump’s heavily criticized attacks against the Fox News anchor.

However, for George P. Bush, there is more at stake than just this election. He is an active Republican and serves as the victory chair for Texas Republicans whose goal is to ensure GOP victories up and down the ballot in the fall. But his decision to offer a lukewarm endorsement of Trump has frustrated some Republicans.

“It’s a very surprising decision, particularly in light of the father, the uncle and the grandfather making it abundantly clear they are not going to endorse Donald Trump for November,” Tom Pauken, former GOP Texas chair and a Trump delegate, told the Austin-American Statesman when Bush was nominated.

According to GOP strategist Matt Mackowiak, who tweeted about the endorsement, George P. Bush’s decision to back Trump is only because he is leading the victory effort in Texas and has a political future to worry about. Talking Points Memo editor Josh Marshall seemed to agree with that assessment.

4: At least in Texas, if you want a future in GOP politics you need to be pro-Trump. Jebs never going to run for office again. His son will.

— Josh Marshall (@joshtpm) August 8, 2016

Watch George P. Bush’s endorsement below:


Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

‘This is Very Disturbing’: Kasich Continues His Refusal to Back Trump

Rumor Check: Photo of Clinton Being Helped Up Stairs Goes Viral — but There’s More to the Story

Former CIA Counterterrorism Agent to Launch Independent Conservative Campaign for President

Famed Investor Jim Rogers: ‘Brexit Was Nothing Compared to What’s Coming’

Sen. Cotton: Emails on Clinton’s Private Server Discussed Scientist Executed by Iran

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, George W. Bush, Jeb Bush, Politics, Video, watch

May 8th, 2016 by Staff Writer

A collection of never-before-seen photographs released to PBS this week in response to a Freedom of Information Act request provide a look at President George W. Bush’s response to the September 11 attacks.

The images, released Friday, were the third batch of its kind released in response to an open records request. Last summer, hundreds of images were published by the U.S. National Archives showing the entire administration in the hours after the Twin Towers collapsed.

The photographs show Bush in the Florida classroom immediately after being informed of the attacks, consulting with aides in Air Force One and preparing to address the nation in the Oval Office.

See the Photographs: 

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Eric Draper/George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via PBS

Follow the author of this story on Twitter and Facebook:
Follow @oliverdarcy

Read more stories from TheBlaze

NBC News Publishes First General Election ‘Battleground Map’ — and It Brings Bad News for One of the Presumptive Nominees

Trump Stuns Critics With Idea to Cut National Debt: ‘Such Remarks…Have No Modern Precedent’

GOP Icon Mary Matalin Explains Why She’s Leaving the Republican Party to Become a Libertarian

Just Days After Becoming Presumptive GOP Nominee, Trump Has Signaled a Change on Two Major Policy Positions

Mitt Romney Met Privately With Never-Trumper Bill Kristol to Discuss Third Party Run

Posted in 9/11, George W. Bush, Photos, US

May 6th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Katrina Pierson, spokeswoman for presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump, slammed former President George W. Bush, claiming he “eviscerated the Constitution with the Patriot Act.”

“Bush no. 2 eviscerated the Constitution with the Patriot Act, grew government,” Pierson bemoaned.

The only problem is, Trump actually sides with Bush on this issue.

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images

During an interview with radio show host Hugh Hewitt in December 2015, the billionaire businessman said, “When you have the world looking at us and would like to destroy us as quickly as possible, I err on the side of security.”

Hewitt pressed Trump on the issue, reminding him that his former Republican rivals Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio are divided on the issue. Cruz opposes the Patriot Act and Rubio would like to see it reinstated.

“What’s Donald Trump think?” Hewitt asked.

Well, I tend to err on the side of security, I must tell you — I’ve been there for longer than you would think,” Trump replied. “But you know when you have people that are beheading our — if you’re a Christian, and frankly for lots of other reasons — when you have the world looking at us and would like to destroy us as quickly as possible, I err on the side of security.

“So that’s the way it is. That’s the way I’ve been, and some people like that frankly, and some people don’t like that,” he added.

In defense of her comments, Pierson told TheBlaze she was highlighting the fact that elected officials are “hypocrites,” adding that she “made that point well.”

Pierson said she was pointing out the “non-conservative positions these anti-Trump people supported pre-Trump.”

TheBlaze’s Oliver Darcy contributed to this report.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Is There a Conservative Third Party Movement Brewing? A Last-Ditch Effort to Stop Trump Could Have Huge Implications

Hannity Says It’s ‘Extremely Shallow’ for People to Blame Him for Rise of Trump

Tow Truck Driver Shows Up to Help Stranded Motorist When He Sees Sticker on Her Car That Makes Him Drive Away: ‘Call the Government’

Kasich to Drop Out of 2016 Race, Leaving Trump as Only Remaining GOP Candidate

Trump Says He Never Believed JFK-Rafael Cruz Conspiracy Theory, Only Wanted People to Read It

Posted in Campaign 2016, CNN, Donald Trump, George W. Bush, GOP Convention 2016, Katrina Pierson, Patriot Act, Politics, Video, watch

May 5th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush do not plan to endorse Donald Trump or play a role in the 2016 campaign, their spokesmen told TheBlaze Wednesday.

“President Bush does not plan to participate in or comment on the presidential campaign,” Freddy Ford, communications director for the younger Bush, said in an email.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The elder Bush’s spokesman, Jim McGrath, said, “At age 91, President Bush is retired from politics.”

“He naturally did a few things to help Jeb, but those were the ‘exceptions that proved the rule,’” McGrath said.

If Bush 41 does fail to endorse, it will be the first time he has stayed silent since his own presidency.

George H.W. Bush, left, talks with former Secretary of State and close friend James Baker III at NRG Stadium on November 2, 2014 in Houston, Texas. (Bob Levey/Getty Images)

George H.W. Bush, left, talks with former Secretary of State and close friend James Baker III at NRG Stadium on November 2, 2014 in Houston, Texas. (Bob Levey/Getty Images)

Both men had briefly returned to the political stage to help Jeb Bush run for the presidency. Barbara Bush joined Jeb on the campaign trail as well, blasting Trump for his rhetoric.

Trump became the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee when his remaining rivals, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Ohio Gov. John Kasich ended their bids this week for the White House.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter and Facebook:
Follow @oliverdarcy

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Ted Cruz Ends Campaign for White House After Crushing Loss in Indiana

Trump is the Presumptive Nominee, So Where Do Never-Trumpers Go Now? We Spoke to Some Leading Voices

Here’s the Message RNC Chairman Reince Priebus Had for Republicans After Cruz Dropped Out of Race

Hoosier Daddy? Cruz Crushed in Indiana Primary

‘Presumptive Nominee’ Trump Thanks ‘Brave’ Cruz, Offers Glimpse Into General Election

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Politics

May 5th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush do not plan to endorse Donald Trump or play a role in the 2016 campaign, their spokesmen told TheBlaze Wednesday.

“President Bush does not plan to participate in or comment on the presidential campaign,” Freddy Ford, communications director for the younger Bush, said in an email.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The elder Bush’s spokesman, Jim McGrath, said, “At age 91, President Bush is retired from politics.”

“He naturally did a few things to help Jeb, but those were the ‘exceptions that proved the rule,’” McGrath said.

If Bush 41 does fail to endorse, it will be the first time he has stayed silent since his own presidency.

George H.W. Bush, left, talks with former Secretary of State and close friend James Baker III at NRG Stadium on November 2, 2014 in Houston, Texas. (Bob Levey/Getty Images)

George H.W. Bush, left, talks with former Secretary of State and close friend James Baker III at NRG Stadium on November 2, 2014 in Houston, Texas. (Bob Levey/Getty Images)

Both men had briefly returned to the political stage to help Jeb Bush run for the presidency. Barbara Bush joined Jeb on the campaign trail as well, blasting Trump for his rhetoric.

Trump became the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee when his remaining rivals, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Ohio Gov. John Kasich ended their bids this week for the White House.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter and Facebook:
Follow @oliverdarcy

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Ted Cruz Ends Campaign for White House After Crushing Loss in Indiana

Trump is the Presumptive Nominee, So Where Do Never-Trumpers Go Now? We Spoke to Some Leading Voices

Here’s the Message RNC Chairman Reince Priebus Had for Republicans After Cruz Dropped Out of Race

Hoosier Daddy? Cruz Crushed in Indiana Primary

‘Presumptive Nominee’ Trump Thanks ‘Brave’ Cruz, Offers Glimpse Into General Election

Posted in Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Politics

May 3rd, 2016 by Staff Writer

Former President George W. Bush took time out of his schedule to meet with 6-year-old presidential history buff Macey Hensley during a visit she took last week to his Dallas library.

Footage of the young whiz kid meeting Bush was captured by the “Ellen” show and aired on the daytime program Monday.

While giving her a tour of the presidential library’s replica Oval Office, Bush pointed to a painting of George Washington.

“You know what I call him?” Bush asked.

“What?” an intrigued Hensley asked.

“The first George W.,” Bush joked.

During the visit, Hensley also showed off her act as a Bush ventriloquist — and even let the former president have a try at it.

“Just kind of try to hide your mouth behind his head,” the 6-year-old advised.

Hensley asked if Laura Bush wanted to also give it a try.

“Sure, I’ve been trying to do this forever,” she joked.

The meeting came a few months after Hensley met President Barack Obama.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter and Facebook:
Follow @oliverdarcy

Read more stories from TheBlaze

‘You Are the Problem’: Cruz Engages in Tense Spontaneous Debate With Die-Hard Trump Supporters Outside Indiana Event

‘Republican Voters Are the Ones Rejecting You’: Host Chuck Todd Presses Cruz to Answer Whether He Will Support a Trump Nomination

Cruz Offers ‘Common Sense’ Response to Caitlyn Jenner’s Critiques Regarding Transgender Bathroom Laws

See How Cruz Handles Child Heckler When Boy Yells Out ‘You Suck’ at Rally: ‘In My Household…’

Department of Education Publishes ‘Shame List’ of Faith-Based Colleges Seeking Title IX Exemption From Transgender Anti-Discrimination Rules

Posted in George W. Bush, US, Video, watch

March 31st, 2016 by Staff Writer

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said today that he’s “confident” both Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush would have fired Corey Lewandowski, the embattled campaign manager to 2016 candidate Donald Trump.

The Jupiter Police Department charged Lewandowski with simple battery Tuesday for a March 8 incident involving ex-Breitbart news reporter Michelle Fields. In the video shared by the Florida police, Lewandowski is seen pulling Fields away from Trump by her arm.

“I am confident that neither President Obama nor President Bush would tolerate someone on their staff being accused of physically assaulting a reporter, lying about it, and then blaming the victim,” Earnest told press Wednesday, adding that Lewandowski’s behavior is “completely unacceptable.”

White House @PressSec: Obama, Bush would fire @CLewandowski_ over assault charges. pic.twitter.com/BXWZUPa2EQ

— Tré Goins-Phillips (@tregp) March 30, 2016

In addition to saying he has no intentions of dismissing Lewandowski, Trump has attacked Fields, suggesting that the former Breitbart reporter was a threat, and his campaign manager was acting to protect him.

Trump asked if he could press charges against Fields over the incident.

Earnest added on Wednesday: “Nobody is particularly surprised that that’s the behavior that Mr. Trump doesn’t just seem to tolerate, he seems to encourage.”

Though Obama and Bush come from different political parties, the White House spokesman said he believes the two men could agree about firing Lewandowski.

“Assaulting a reporter is wrong, assaulting women is wrong, and the accusations that have been raised about Mr. Lewandowski’s conduct go directly to those core values,” he said. “I’m confident that they — despite our many disagreements on a range of other issues — I’m confident that they would agree with me on this one.”

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

See How Trump Answers When Asked to Name the ‘Top Three’ Functions of the Federal Government

Tense Scene Unfolds When Black Woman Accuses White Student of Cultural Appropriation for Dreadlocks

Trump Asks if He Can ‘Press Charges’ Against Ex-Breitbart Reporter Because She Allegedly Touched Him First

VIDEO: Teen Protester Claims She Was Groped at Trump Rally Before She Threw a Punch and Got a Face Full of Pepper Spray

Poll: Cruz Racing Away From Trump, Kasich in Wisconsin

Posted in Barack Obama, Campaign 2016, Donald Trump, George W. Bush, Josh Earnest, Politics, Video

February 20th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Tension in the Fox News studio seemed to be at an all-time high Friday when host Dana Perino challenged co-host Eric Bolling on Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s attacks on former President George W. Bush.

Perino, who served as Bush’s press secretary and is a close family friend, seemed very frustrated by Trump’s recent claims that Bush lied his way into the Iraq War. Bolling and co-host Juan Williams, however, noted that the comments are having little impact on the billionaire’s candidacy.

“You can lie about a former president and it’s OK, it’s just like, wow, wow, and that’s just OK. You’re OK with it, I’m not,” Perino told Bolling, as the “The Five” studio fell awkwardly silent.

“I didn’t say I’m OK with it, Dana,” Bolling said. “[Y]ou’re putting words in my mouth. I didn’t say I was OK with someone lying about a former president.”

Bolling insisted that he is not OK with the candidate’s comments, acknowleding that Trump has since walked back the claim.

“Please don’t put words in my mouth,” he concluded.

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Pope Francis Suggests Donald Trump ‘Is Not Christian’ Due to His Tough Immigration Stance. Here’s How Trump Responded.

Beyonce Concert in Tampa Expected to Sell Out — Here’s What Happened When Police Got a Request to Provide Security (UPDATED)

Scientist Reveals the ‘Big Fundamental Truth’ That He Says Shows That Science and the Bible Are Compatible

Trump Confronted Over Report That He Supported Invading Iraq in 2002: ‘I Don’t Remember That’

‘I Deserve an Apology’: College Students Gather, Share Wounded Emotions After Conservative Writer’s Lecture

Posted in Campaign 2016, Dana Perino, Donald Trump, Eric Bolling, Fox News, George W. Bush, Media, Politics, Video, watch

February 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

Former Vice President Dick Cheney, who served alongside former President George W. Bush, issued a bold criticism of Republican presidential contender Donald Trump Monday, saying the billionaire “sounds like a liberal Democrat” when it comes to the Iraq war and 9/11.

“You heard at the debate Saturday Donald Trump accuse President Bush and his team of purposefully lying the country into war in Iraq, saying, ‘I will tell you they lied, they said there were weapons of mass destruction, there were none. They knew there were none.’ Your response?” Fox News anchor Bret Baier asked.

The former vice president was quick to voice his feelings, telling the “Special Report” host that not only does he believe the billionaire businessman is wrong, but he also said he “sounds like a liberal Democrat.”

Image source: Fox News screenshot

Image source: Fox News screenshot

“He sounds like a liberal Democrat to me, Bret. He’s wrong and I think he’s deliberately promoting those views in order to advance his political interests,” Cheney said.

Regarding Trump’s claim that the Bush administration “lied” about having weapons of mass destruction, Cheney cited the investigation by the Robb-Silberman Commission, telling Baier that “they found no evidence whatsoever” to support the GOP hopeful’s assertions.

As for Trump’s comments during Saturday’s debate that Bush did not keep the U.S. safe because “the World Trade Center came down during [his] reign,” Cheney argued there was “nothing” that could be done.

“On the notion, for example, that the president failed to act before 9/11 to stop it, we had no actionable intelligence at that point. It simply wasn’t available. There was nothing we could have done and we didn’t have intelligence at that point to suggest other than there’s a general kind of a threat,” Cheney said.

The former vice president went on to defend the polices he and Bush instituted, saying that the Bush White House did “keep the nation safe for 7 1/2 years.

“The president put in place important programs, the terrorist surveillance program, enhanced terrorist techniques, all of those things gave us the information we needed to be able to act, and we had the tremendous support of the American military, they did a superb job,” Cheney added.

Cheney added that Iraq was in “great shape” when he left Washington, D.C. As for what has happened since, the former vice president placed the blame on President Barack Obama’s policies.

“What happened then was that Barack Obama came to town, withdrew presence from that part of the world, and ISIS emerged after that. You’ve got to tell the whole story if you want to focus on those events. And, of course, Mr. Trump never does,” Cheney said.

Cheney told Baier is it “hard to tell” if Trump is a Republican, but ultimately said he would support the GOP presidential nominee. However, he says Trump won’t be selected if he continues to act the way he is.

“If he continues operating the way he’s operating, as a liberal Democrat, I don’t think he’ll get the nomination,” he said.

Watch the interview:

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

Follow the author of this story on Twitter:
Follow @tregp

Read more stories from TheBlaze

‘It Wasn’t a Heart Attack’: Confusion and Conflicting Reports Surround Justice Scalia’s Death

Ted Cruz Says Second Amendment Will Be ‘Written Out of the Constitution’ If Any of These Presidential Candidates Are Elected

‘He Is a Lying Guy’: Trump Goes Postal on Cruz in Rambling Press Conference

‘I Swore I Was Never Going to Tell This Story’: Audience Gasps as Glenn Beck Reveals ‘One of the Real Reasons’ He Left Fox News

Jeb Bush Is Asked if GOP Senate Should Schedule a Vote if New Supreme Court Justice Is Nominated. Here’s How He Replies.

Posted in Campaign 2016, Dick Cheney, Donald Trump, George W. Bush, Politics, Video, watch

February 16th, 2016 by Staff Writer

NORTH CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA – Former President George W. Bush hit the campaign trail for his struggling younger brother Jeb Bush on Monday, taking several shots at Republican frontrunner Donald Trump.

“Strength is not theatrics,” George W. Bush said. “Strength is not bluster. Real strength is measured by integrity and character. In my experience the strongest person usually isn’t the loudest person in the room.”

Former US President George W. Bush (R) waves with his wife Laura (L) as he stands with his brother and Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush during a campaign rally in Charleston, South Carolina, February 15, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Former US President George W. Bush (R) waves with his wife Laura (L) as he stands with his brother and Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush during a campaign rally in Charleston, South Carolina, February 15, 2016.  ( JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Though the former president never mentioned  Trump by name, it was clear to the audience who he was referring to. Bush was warmly received by the audience.

Jeb Bush, a former Florida governor, who once sought to distance himself from his family, celebrated his brother’s accomplishments as president for keeping America safe. Just days earlier in a presidential debate, Trump accused President George W. Bush of intentionally lying about the weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and allowing 9/11 to happen on his watch.

“The dialogue back and forth made me wonder if it was Michael Moore I was talking to,” Jeb Bush told audience.

Charleston resident Jonathan Borrow, 36, who attended the event is undecided, but thought the Trump comment during the weekend debate was over the top on 9/11. However, he didn’t feel as strong about the Trump comments on Iraq and the second President Bush.

“Bush was in office just nine months when 9/11 happened. It was a total intelligence failure, but there’s blame to go around,” Borrow told TheBlaze. “Iraq is an open question to bring up. That’s fair game. I don’t know how that connects to Jeb, but it has merit.”

Several in the audience identified themselves as undecided, but said they came to see a former president speak. Though Bush left office unpopular, most in the crowd at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center gave him a warm reception.

The former president said he understood that much of the country was frustrated and angry.

“But we do not need someone in the Oval Office who simply mirrors our frustration,” George W. Bush said. “We need someone who can fix our frustrations and that is Jeb Bush.”

In a state heavy with Christian conservatives, the former president drew a contrast between his brother and the frontrunner.

“Jeb has a deep faith that reveals itself in good works not loud words,” the former president. “…Jeb will rise above the petty name calling.”

Roy Croo, 18, of Charleston, just recently registered to vote and isn’t sure who he’ll vote for in Saturday’s primary.

“This is the first political rally I’ve been to,” he told TheBlaze. “I’m not sure who I’m voting for, but the fact that he brought me out to hear what he has to say is a sign that it helps.”

During his introduction, South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, who endorsed Jeb Bush after dropping out of the presidential race, said to the former president, “South Carolina misses you. The country misses you,” he then added, “This is Bush country.”

South Carolina has been a big state for the Bush family in the past.

George W. Bush saved his campaign in 2000 after taking a pounding by John McCain in New Hampshire, then trouncing his opponent in the first-in-the-south contest.

George H.W. Bush lost the state’s primary to Ronald Reagan in 1980, but won South Carolina twice, fending off Bob Dole in 1988 and as an incumbent president defeated Pat Buchanan in 1992.

So is it still Bush country?

Jason Pluchinsky, a Charleston local and a Jeb Bush supporter, thinks the support from former the president helps. But he doesn’t think it will be enough to lift him to victory.

“I think it helps 100 percent,” Pluchisky told TheBlaze. “George W. is 60 percent of the reason we are here. I think he’ll get a lot of people to at least hear what Jeb has to say. He won’t win, but I think it will be Cruz or Trump then Jeb.”

Read more stories from TheBlaze

‘It Wasn’t a Heart Attack’: Confusion and Conflicting Reports Surround Justice Scalia’s Death

Ted Cruz Says Second Amendment Will Be ‘Written Out of the Constitution’ If Any of These Presidential Candidates Are Elected

‘He Is a Lying Guy’: Trump Goes Postal on Cruz in Rambling Press Conference

‘I Swore I Was Never Going to Tell This Story’: Audience Gasps as Glenn Beck Reveals ‘One of the Real Reasons’ He Left Fox News

Jeb Bush Is Asked if GOP Senate Should Schedule a Vote if New Supreme Court Justice Is Nominated. Here’s How He Replies.

Posted in Campaign 2016, George W. Bush, Jeb Bush, Politics, South Carolina

December 8th, 2015 by Staff Writer

President Barack Obama delivered his primetime address on terrorism Sunday night from a podium in the Oval Office, striking many as unusual. But White House press secretary Josh Earnest pointed out Monday that Obama’s predecessor did the same thing.

“In doing your homework, I’m sure you saw the pictures of President Bush standing before a podium in the Oval Office making a few announcements,” Earnest said. “I think, in general, what we have found is, we reached the same conclusion that many of your colleagues in the television industry, which is when [TV reporters] go to the South Lawn [to deliver their reports], they call it a stand up for a reason.”

President Barack Obama delivers an address to the nation in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Sunday, Dec. 6, 2015. Obama sought to soothe a nation shaken by the terrorist attack in a California town with assurances that the U.S. is hardening its defenses that were tempered by an acknowledgment that the threat to the country is ever-evolving. (Saul Loeb/Pool via Bloomberg)

President Barack Obama delivers an address to the nation in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., Sunday. Obama sought to soothe a nation shaken by the San Bernardino, California, terrorist attack with assurances that the U.S. is hardening its defenses. (Saul Loeb/Pool via Bloomberg)

President George W. Bush, having already previously nominated John G. Roberts to the high court, announced in September 2005 he was nominating Roberts as chief justice after the death of William Rehnquist.

President Bush announces Supreme Court nominee John Roberts to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court during a statement in the Oval Office Monday September 5, 2005. (Chuck Kennedy/MCT/MCT via Getty Images)

President Bush announces Supreme Court nominee John Roberts to be chief justice of the Supreme Court during a statement in the Oval Office Sept. 5, 2005. (Chuck Kennedy/MCT/MCT via Getty Images)

In October, Bush nominated White House counsel Harriet Miers to the court from the Oval Office. Her nomination was withdrawn after it was clear that she did not have support from Senate Republicans.

Supreme Court justice nominee Harriet Miers (L) looks over at US President George W. Bush as he announces her nomination to the Supreme Court 03 October 2005 in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, DC. Miers, has withdrawn her nomination, the White House announced 27 October, 2005. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Supreme Court justice nominee Harriet Miers looks over at President George W. Bush as he announces her nomination to the Supreme Court Oct. 3, 2005, in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, D.C. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Read more stories from TheBlaze

Obama Calls San Bernardino Attack ‘Terrorism,’ Endorses Controversial Gun Control Provisions

‘The Bible Calls for Killing Nonbelievers’: Atheists Ask Major Hotel Chains to Ax Bibles From Guest Rooms — Here’s Their Fiery Argument

Here’s How Some Republican Presidential Candidates Reacted to Obama’s Oval Office Address

Public University: ‘Ensure Your Holiday Party Is Not a Christmas Party In Disguise’

Trump Calls for ‘Total & Complete Shutdown of Muslims Entering’ the U.S. Until ‘Problem’ Is Fixed

Posted in Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Government

October 21st, 2015 by Staff Writer

Karl Rove explained on Fox News Tuesday that certain “attacks” Ted Cruz leveled against George W. Bush had left a bad taste in the former president’s mouth.

Karl Rove talks in his mobile phone as he walks across the floor before the second session of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012. (Photo: AP)

Karl Rove talks in his mobile phone as he walks across the floor before the second session of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012. (Photo: AP)

The remarks from “the architect” came one day after a report that Bush had told a small group of donors that the Texas senator gets under his skin.

“This is from one person at am event. Neither you or I were there. I do know that President Bush has expressed some, on a number of occasions, a little bit of astonishment as to the attacks that Ted made on him,” Rove said.

He continued, “For example, he went out of his way to attack his appointment of John Roberts to the Supreme Court and his father’s appointment of David Souter to the Supreme Court. And yet at the time of the appointment of John Roberts, Ted Cruz was a personal friend of John Roberts, wrote a strongly positive piece about him emphasizing the personal friendship and knowledge. He said both John Roberts and the man that appointed him, George W. Bush, were strong, dependable conservatives.”

“For example, he went out of his way to attack his appointment of John Roberts…”

Share:

“And yet then turned around for political purposes and attacked 43 and 41, for appointing bad people to the Supreme Court but didn’t say a single word about Ronald Reagan appointing Justice Kennedy and Justice O’Connor who on many occasions over the years disappointed conservatives,” Rove concluded. “So he thought it was a little bit opportunistic and wondered why he was going out of his way… instead of making a principled case that, you know, ‘Look, presidents have appointed judges who turned out to be wrong, I won’t be that way.’ He took two men whose last name was Bush and said they each appointed a bad person and then was quiet about somebody who appointed two people.”

(H/T: Real Clear Politics)

Follow the author of this story on Twitter and Facebook:
Follow @oliverdarcy

Read more stories from TheBlaze

This Is How Much Not Having Health Insurance Will Cost Starting in 2016

Actress Takes Impassioned Stand Supporting Right to Pray in Public on ‘The View’ — and One Co-Host Doesn’t Seem to Like It

George W. Bush Reportedly Tells Donors a Secret: Of All GOP Candidates, There’s One He Can’t Stand

‘That’s a Lie!’: Geraldo Explodes When Jesse Watters Accuses Clinton of ‘One Lie I Cannot Abide’

Students Say They Are Absolutely Dumbfounded by Reason School Is Punishing Them for ‘Racial Insensitivity’

Posted in George W. Bush, Karl Rove, Politics, Ted Cruz, Video, watch

October 20th, 2015 by Staff Writer

George W. Bush is apparently no fan of Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

The former president told a small group of Jeb Bush donors recently that Cruz gets under his skin and is the most serious challenge his brother faces for the Republican nomination, Politico reported.

“I just don’t like the guy,” Bush said, according to Politico, which cited more than half a dozen donors at the event.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

One donor told Politico that it was stunning to hear the attack on Cruz.

“He said he thought Cruz was going to be a pretty formidable candidate against Jeb…”

Share:

“I was like, ‘Holy s**t, did he just say that?’” the donor told the news outlet. “I remember looking around and seeing that other people were also looking around surprised.”

“The tenor of what he said about the other candidates was really pretty pleasant,” another added to Politico. “Until he got to Cruz.”

One donor told Politico that Bush said he found Cruz to be “opportunistic” for his apparent alliance with Donald Trump.

Another said that Bush was worried Cruz would give his brother Jeb a run for his money.

“He said he thought Cruz was going to be a pretty formidable candidate against Jeb, especially in Texas and across the South,” a donor told Politico.

Cruz, in usual fashion, responded in a statement to Politico with praise for the former president.

“I have great respect for George W Bush, and was proud to work on his 2000 campaign and in his administration,” Cruz said. “It’s no surprise that President Bush is supporting his brother and attacking the candidates he believes pose a threat to his campaign. I have no intention of reciprocating. I met my wife Heidi working on his campaign, and so I will always be grateful to him.”

Follow the author of this story on Twitter and Facebook:
Follow @oliverdarcy

Read more stories from TheBlaze

This Is How Much Not Having Health Insurance Will Cost Starting in 2016

Actress Takes Impassioned Stand Supporting Right to Pray in Public on ‘The View’ — and One Co-Host Doesn’t Seem to Like It

Driver’s Astonishing Response After He’s Caught on Video Swerving His Car Into a Passing Motorcycle and Sending the Riders Crashing to the Road

Texas Governor Issues Clear Three-Word Response to Hillary Clinton After Her Remarks on Mandatory Gun Buy-Backs Spark Confiscation Fears

California Middle School Principal Is Openly Withholding Student Election Results Because She Wanted More Minorities to Win

Posted in George W. Bush, Jeb Bush, Politics, Ted Cruz

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons